TeenHelp
Support Forums Today's Posts


Get Advice Connect with TeenHelp Resources
HelpLINK Facebook     Twitter     Tumblr     Instagram    Hotlines    Safety Zone


You are not registered or have not logged in

Hello guest! (Not a guest? Log in above!)

As a guest on TeenHelp you are only able to use some of our site's features. By registering an account you will be able to enjoy unlimited access to our site, and will be able to:

Signing up is free, anonymous and will only take a few moments, so click here to register now!



General Health This forum is for any questions or concerns about your health and wellbeing.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  (#1 (permalink)) Old
seamair Offline
four-leaf clover
Welcome me, I'm new!
*
 
seamair's Avatar
 
Name: Sue
Gender: Female
Location: Europe

Posts: 47
Join Date: March 5th 2017

Misophonia - March 17th 2017, 05:54 PM

Hey guys,

I don't know whether you've ever heard of misophonia, in case you didn't it's a syndrome that causes one to react in a particular way to some triggering sounds (it's obviously different for every individual). In my case the triggers are the sounds of a radio, people speaking or music, but only if what I hear is kinda muffled, for example by a wall (I'm usually not triggered if I'm trying to fall asleep in a room full of people... yeah).
It's not only annoying, but makes me feel uncontrollable anger and helplessness. It depends on the situation but I'm sometimes only able to shout or cry.

It's especially unpleasant for me at school, for example during a lesson where everyone's speaking/singing/whatever... because then I can't calm down as it's forbidden to leave the classroom during a lesson.

I guess I don't even have to mention snoring since it annoys everyone...

I've tried different kinds of earplugs, but none of them work. If I feel like getting triggered I usually put on headphones (when possible), but it's not a good solution, because listening to music is not always convenient for whatever I'm doing... like studying or trying to fall asleep.

Do you have any ideas how to overcome it/cope?
Thank you very much in advance.
Sue


don't cry because it ended - smile because it happened
   
Reply With Quote
  (#2 (permalink)) Old
Cassado Offline
I was normal three cats ago.

TeenHelp Addict
************
 
Cassado's Avatar
 
Age: 18
Gender: Female
Location: Cat napping.

Posts: 7,539
Join Date: August 25th 2012

Re: Misophonia - March 18th 2017, 02:12 PM

Misophonia can be really irritating but I am glad you're looking for ways to cope with it!

If you're able to leave the situation that is triggering you, you can do that. However, something someone has discussed with me is that leaving makes you feel better, but it could be better in the long run to sit through the agitation because there will be times when you cannot leave the situation (school, like you mentioned).

Something that has been suggested to me is to take deep breaths when something is agitating, and then use self-talk in the place of the noises. Over time, you can make it so you hear yourself more than you hear what is around you. For instance, you can remind yourself that everything is okay, that the noise you're hearing is uncomfortable but it will subside soon.

You could invest in a sound machine for when you're trying to sleep. Many of them have different sounds, such as running water, rain forests, and campfires. I don't know if you would be okay with those sounds since the radio is bothersome to you, sound machines tend to have a little more clarity than the radio. You said listening to music is ineffective when you're trying to study or sleep, but you could try listening to guided meditations as well. There is a lot of those on YouTube. They're usually rather quiet.

Where do you usually study? Do you have the ability to move somewhere else to study? For instance, if it's a nice day, you could try going outside, or going to a library as an alternative.


Articles Officer|Resource Editor|Senior Newsletter Editor| Forum & Community Moderator

1941 - 2016
Those we love don't go away
They walk beside us
every day
unseen, unheard,
but always near
still loved, still missed,
and very dear.
   
Reply With Quote
  (#3 (permalink)) Old
Krazy Offline
Member
Welcome me, I'm new!
*
 
Krazy's Avatar
 

Posts: 4
Join Date: November 15th 2016

Re: Misophonia - March 19th 2017, 04:20 AM

I think I might have slight misophonia. I don't like hearing certain men breathing. I think it sounds sexual and gets on my nerves.
   
Reply With Quote
  (#4 (permalink)) Old
Lionheart Offline
Member
Junior TeenHelper
****
 
Lionheart's Avatar
 
Name: Oliver
Age: 23
Gender: It's complicated
Location: Neverland

Posts: 338
Join Date: December 17th 2013

Re: Misophonia - March 19th 2017, 06:51 PM

Cassado already gave some great ideas. Breathing exercises can help a lot.
Appart from that what I do at university is take one of those papers with all the squares in it and paint every single square. Sometimes I make patterns, sometimes I simply scribble into them. Whatever you feel like. Try to concentrate only on the squares and maybe try some challenges, like your only allowed to use four colors and no square is allowed to have the same color as the neighbouring one.
Also, sometimes biting on pencils helps. Though don't take plastic ones, only those made of wood, cause the plastic can easily break and you could get hurt. It's not really good for your teeth though.


Breath. Just breath. It's ok to make a mistake. It's ok to fail. It's ok to give in to an urge. It's ok. So just breath and soon you'll be strong again.

Courage isn't always a loud roar. Sometimes it is a quiet whisper at the end of a day saying: Tomorrow I will try it again!


Children don't need ghost storys to know about the evil. They already know that there are monsters. They need ghost storys to know, that in the end everything will be alright
   
Reply With Quote
  (#5 (permalink)) Old
del677 Offline
Member
Average Joe
***
 
del677's Avatar
 

Posts: 122
Join Date: December 28th 2016

Re: Misophonia - March 22nd 2017, 09:20 AM

I am fascinated by this! Thank you for describing it.

Mentioning what you can do when you feel you might be triggered made me think of the WRAP workbook. (Wellness Action Recovery Plan).

The basic idea is write a list of triggers. Then write a list of actions you can take if you encounter a trigger. Writing a list of triggers helps one become more cognizant of the triggers. And having a list of actions you can take is well, planning ahead.

There's also make a list of how you feel when you are well. And how you feel when things are breaking down (something is getting to you). This helps one become more aware of what's happening in our body, our feelings, helps us know if we are well, or identifying early warning signs.

There's also a list of things we need to do each day to stay well.

I'm guessing (without knowing) that you could easily get special permission to leave a class at any time for medical necessity reasons if you detect something is triggering you, or you are slipping downhill and need a break. I suppose it depends on who you talk with. Who do you need to get permission from? Who is going to complain if you leave? Would they really rather have a student flip to uncontrollable anger? I'm guessing the "No one leave" rule is more for students who would otherwise decide they'd rather just wander in and out as they please because, I don't know, why would they need such a rule? We never had a rule like that (maybe because we all just behaved so they didn't need a rule?). If someone needed to leave they'd ask the teacher, just to be polite. We had slips of paper called "Hall Pass", which in hindsight I think was all a ruse, as there were no hall police. Anyway, I suspect if teacher understands your special need, and if the rest of the class understands, then they'll all be happy letting you freely leave as needed so you aren't trapped in a situation with no exit strategy plan.

My other idea is noise cancelling headphones. I know the open ear Sennheiser HDC 451 specifically does not block normal speech frequencies, so you can wear it and still talk with people and hear them, yet it blocks out other noises. (Though I don't know if that would help, or if the resulting sound would be triggering!)

Beyond that I am fascinated by this description of specific sound triggered strong emotion response. Sounds similar to some forms of autism (or Asperger's) where certain specific sounds can be excruciating, which aren't excruciating to most people.

Chapter 8 of the 2015 book by Norman Doidge M.D. gives a fascinating description of how specific sounds can exercise the inner ear muscles so they work properly and properly filter out background noise, and how normal people can be in a crowd of many people having many conversations, and how we can still focus on the person we're talking with and filter out all the other conversations. (Apparently old people who need hearing aids have trouble with this. Engineers are trying to make a smart hearing aid that will do this for them.)

Oh the book is The Brain's way of healing.

I guess the other suggestion, is there is a way to strengthen the brain's anterior cingulate, which is a part of the brain which decides if we will react rationally or emotionally, so having this part stronger gives us more control to make that decision, rather than just having it happen to us. That is what Mindfulness Meditation achieves. If you can do that for 15 minutes a day for two months it should make a difference. Qi-gong, tai-chi, yoga, are other similar mind training exercises. I don't know if they work for misophonia. Breathing exercises also fall in this group.

You could also research "Polyvagal theory", "sympathetic nervous system" vs. "parasympathetic nervous system". These are all theories to explain why the above works.

Well that's my knowledge dump. I have no idea if any of it is useful for misophonia. Sounds fascinating. I shall research it more as it's similar to other things I'm interested in. Thank you! Best wishes!
   
Reply With Quote
  (#6 (permalink)) Old
seamair Offline
four-leaf clover
Welcome me, I'm new!
*
 
seamair's Avatar
 
Name: Sue
Gender: Female
Location: Europe

Posts: 47
Join Date: March 5th 2017

Re: Misophonia - March 22nd 2017, 09:06 PM

Thank you very much for your replies. They're really helpful.

@Cassado
Well there are usually more sounds when I go outside than when I'm home and the library is a bit too far away. Although your suggestions concerning the sound machine and meditations are interesting. I shall try those when I have the possibility, thanks!

@del677
That's an exhaustive reply. Thank you.
However, I am not sure whether becoming more aware of the triggers will actually help. The thing is - imagine a situation: I'm reading a book and a neighbour starts playing some music. Two minutes pass and I realise the music's playing. Only after actually realising the sound do I feel anxious. The music may play/the people may chatter/whatever and unless I'm aware of the sound, I will be perfectly fine. Although it's usually hard not to be aware of it if there would be complete silence otherwise.
When it comes down to school, it would be probably possible for me to get a permission to leave from the head teacher for example. I'm not sure about it, though. The reason is I would have to justify myself (if not say the exact reason, give some kind of explanation at least - to every teacher that gives a lesson when I'd like to leave). I know it may sound immature, but I kinda wouldn't like to do that. Even if misophonia was a perfectly relevant reason to leave. Unfortunately I think it wouldn't be considered a relevant reason by teachers anyways.
Your mention about the similarity to other disorders such as forms of autism or Asperger's is very accurate and fascinating. I've never really thought of that, but you're right.
Thank you again for all the methods you thought of. I'll definitely try some of them. If you'd ever like to talk more about this topic or similar ones I'm always willing to do so since it's extremely interesting for me as well. ^^


don't cry because it ended - smile because it happened
   
Reply With Quote
  (#7 (permalink)) Old
Cassado Offline
I was normal three cats ago.

TeenHelp Addict
************
 
Cassado's Avatar
 
Age: 18
Gender: Female
Location: Cat napping.

Posts: 7,539
Join Date: August 25th 2012

Re: Misophonia - March 23rd 2017, 02:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by seamair View Post
Thank you very much for your replies. They're really helpful.

@Cassado
Well there are usually more sounds when I go outside than when I'm home and the library is a bit too far away. Although your suggestions concerning the sound machine and meditations are interesting. I shall try those when I have the possibility, thanks!

@del677
That's an exhaustive reply. Thank you.
However, I am not sure whether becoming more aware of the triggers will actually help. The thing is - imagine a situation: I'm reading a book and a neighbour starts playing some music. Two minutes pass and I realise the music's playing. Only after actually realising the sound do I feel anxious. The music may play/the people may chatter/whatever and unless I'm aware of the sound, I will be perfectly fine. Although it's usually hard not to be aware of it if there would be complete silence otherwise.
When it comes down to school, it would be probably possible for me to get a permission to leave from the head teacher for example. I'm not sure about it, though. The reason is I would have to justify myself (if not say the exact reason, give some kind of explanation at least - to every teacher that gives a lesson when I'd like to leave). I know it may sound immature, but I kinda wouldn't like to do that. Even if misophonia was a perfectly relevant reason to leave. Unfortunately I think it wouldn't be considered a relevant reason by teachers anyways.
Your mention about the similarity to other disorders such as forms of autism or Asperger's is very accurate and fascinating. I've never really thought of that, but you're right.
Thank you again for all the methods you thought of. I'll definitely try some of them. If you'd ever like to talk more about this topic or similar ones I'm always willing to do so since it's extremely interesting for me as well. ^^
I can see that happening because it's harder to cope with and control your surroundings when you're not at home. I don't know if I wrote this earlier, so apologies if I did, but you could try to bring fidget toys or something that resembles safety into school with you. If you hear bothersome sounds, you can try focusing on that item instead.

You might be able to talk to someone higher than a teacher, like a counselor or your principal about misophonia. Maybe you can ask them to speak to your teachers so you don't have to tell them why you have to leave every time you need a few minutes to yourself.


Articles Officer|Resource Editor|Senior Newsletter Editor| Forum & Community Moderator

1941 - 2016
Those we love don't go away
They walk beside us
every day
unseen, unheard,
but always near
still loved, still missed,
and very dear.
   
Reply With Quote
  (#8 (permalink)) Old
del677 Offline
Member
Average Joe
***
 
del677's Avatar
 

Posts: 122
Join Date: December 28th 2016

Re: Misophonia - March 25th 2017, 10:27 AM

That's a great idea Cassado has. You could start by telling any adult, and have that adult pass the message along to all the others who need to know.

(I don't know how it is in Europe, but in the U.S. a note from a doctor is like having a note from God. Whatever a doctor says is OK because a doctor said it, and doctors have this unofficial unstated special status in the U.S. I understand it's not like that in other countries. Apparently in other countries people are more rational and normal and level headed and doctors are just other normal people.)
   
Reply With Quote
  (#9 (permalink)) Old
del677 Offline
Member
Average Joe
***
 
del677's Avatar
 

Posts: 122
Join Date: December 28th 2016

Re: Misophonia - Yesterday, 06:04 AM

I was doing some similar research for a friend and I came across this information and some sound files. I don't know if listening to pink noise will help desensitize or not. It's a somewhat experimental treatment. There's some anecdotal evidence that it helps some people.

Misophonia UK
http://www.misophonia-uk.org/


simplynoise
SimplyRain
Rain Sound. Babbling Brook. White Noise. Pink Noise. Brown Noise. Other sounds. Downloads. $1 apps for your phone.
https://simplynoise.com/


Types of Sound Sensitivity (article)
Type 4 is MISOPHONIA/PHONOPHOBIA:
http://www.hyperacusis.net/what-is-i...d-sensitivity/


Sensory Differences
http://www.autism.org.uk/sensory


Arbaclofen (drug)
http://www.misophonia-uk.org/drugs-i...al-trials.html


Quiet Please (documentary on mysophonia)
http://www.quietpleasefilm.com/
8 min trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFj7YJbubvE
2 min trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRfi...ature=youtu.be
   
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
misophonia

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All material copyright 1998-2016, TeenHelp.
Terms | Legal | Privacy | Conduct

Powered by vBulletin®.
Copyright ©2000-2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search engine optimization by vBSEO.
Theme developed in association with vBStyles.