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"Too good" for a job? - June 28th 2013, 07:03 PM

My friends are killing me. I can't believe we went to the same high school and stuff. They aren't in their teens anymore but they are fine living off of their parents. We're almost halfway through our 20s and they are being picky where they work.

Is it me or is there a trend where people are picky where they work? One is being kicked out of her home because her mom is moving in with her boyfriend and she has a little bit over a month to find a new job. She needs money asap to be able to afford an apartment, but she won't consider fast food or a grocery store. She's trying for all of these hospital positions, but I don't have the heart to tell her that a lot of them are looking for certified nursing assistants and for nursing students to fill the positions. At least I convinced her to look at working in the cafeteria services at the hospital because they pay a lot more than they should.
   
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Re: "Too good" for a job? - June 29th 2013, 12:50 AM

Not sure how common it's getting but I know a few people in my area that are also in their 20's and who seem to be jumping from 1 job to another. It kinda bothers me to know that they're not happy with their job and seem to be more happy living at home doing nothing. Especially when we have how many people out there looking for jobs and not having any luck.
   
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Re: "Too good" for a job? - June 29th 2013, 04:22 AM

Well, ok, i know for me that the idea of working somewhere that was fast food would probably make me feel physically/mentally sick, I wouldn't apply to places like that as long as I felt i had other options. It's not that I feel like I am to good for it, if I needed a job and I needed it NOW I'd take what I could find, after all just cause you get a job doesn't mean you can't look for something better. Trust me, I have had a fast food job AND used to work in a department store, money is money after all, as long as I come by it legally, my point is that at the time those places were convenient. But it's a challenge, especially if your in college or university and/or have experiences that relate to another field, it can be really frustrating to accept that you might have to take a job like fast food, but at the same time those are the kinds of places that usually hire a lot of part time people and have great flexibility with hours.

So the problem is that your friend just may not have reached the point where she accepts that she needs a quick fix. Which is maybe how you should present it to her, because if her situation is that she'll be homeless otherwise then she should find the "quick fix" job until she gets the job she wants. It doesn't have to be mcdonalds, but waitressing or retail isn't quite as skuzzy or gross. Right now she might not have accepted the reality of her situation yet, she might not realize her options are limited with the time frame which she's been given.

It can be hard to approach though, like I know a few people assume i think I am "too good" for fast food and grocery stores yet I am not, it's just that I'm not about to work somewhere that revolting (think mcdonald's) is unless I really needed too (not all places are that horrible though, places like starbucks and even ice cream places are half decent) and i hate it when people act like I am being stuck up when I am merely applying to the places I want to work at the most first. But suggesting she applies to a few of the nicer restaurants in town might help, she might think you're accusing her of being stuck up if you bring up fast food (that's how i've felt at least) which might not be the case at all, like i said, she might just not realize how serious her situation is and that she doesn't have the time to have high standards. There is nothing wrong with having standards and taking your top options out first, but it sounds like she doesn't have a time frame which will allow for it, so gently pointing that out might help. Especially if you live in a city, you can help her find a restaurant/retail job and set up some volunteering in her field so that it'll be easier to get a job later, that's what I do, even though I am currently looking for a job, it's been tough to find something even though I've been trying BUUUT I used to work in a coffee shop, which isn't stellar but it helps, but then I volunteer with kids with developmental issues and a few other social typed-things so that I'll be in a better position to get the kind of jobs I want when I can. But if you present it as a "Sally, I'm worried about you, you only have X long to find a job and I found Y places that are hiring right now, I think you should apply there just so that you have something until you can find the kind of job you want, I don't want you to end up in a position where you have no where to live because you couldn't find a job doing what you want quick enough so please think about applying to these places, I even have experience doing Z work so I can help you tailor a resume for it" if you present it as concern (as opposed to a criticism) she'll take it better




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Re: "Too good" for a job? - June 29th 2013, 07:16 AM

I'd recommend that you talk to them. While I agree with Wallflower about preferring a job in a hospital over McDonalds, they need to know how to make the "Plan A, B, and C" method. Basically, this involves applying at the jobs that they would like...while also applying at the jobs that they wouldn't like as much. I did this with my current job; I applied at about four jobs, two that I really didn't want, and two that I did that were much higher in quality. That way, even if I got denied from the jobs that I liked, I would have still had a place to work. (I ended up getting the job I wanted, but I feel this extra work ethic helped the jobs i wanted see that I was qualified.)

The idea about them not caring about living-off their parents, I think it's difference in expectation of parents along with difference in how comfortable they are. I couldn't live off my parents, we didn't have the money for that, so it wasn't an option. For their family, they might be better-off, and can afford that. Their parents also may not set the expectation that they need to have a job, while our parents may have raised us with different values. Neither is "better" or "right," but yours is definitely going to set you up for more immediate success. Try to talk to them about the benefits of being on your own, the way it feels when you spend your own money. It can kind of suck to pay bills, but can also be quite rewarding.


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Re: "Too good" for a job? - June 29th 2013, 01:12 PM

And you have to realize that many peoples parents are willing to help their kids out while their in university. The kids ARE NOT taking advantage, the parents want to help to the point it's practically insisted on. It's actually really hurtful when people act like your taking advantage or what ever. Now if your friend isn't in school then that's a whole other can of worms, but parental support can help their kids avoid debt and most parents would do that if they could. So don't jump to conclusions about those circumstances




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Re: "Too good" for a job? - June 30th 2013, 01:59 AM

I think it's perfectly natural to be "picky" in today's world. Many people taking these McDonald's-type jobs have college degrees and used to have dreams. It's a consequence of the information age to want more than the mundane jobs people have always worked. Having worked in food service before, I can honestly say I'd rather go die in the woods than face the prospect of doing it again for any length of time.



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Re: "Too good" for a job? - July 2nd 2013, 03:54 AM

Both of the families are not in the position to pay for the kids. Their parents' credits are ruined and cannot even cosign a loan or get them an apartment. Their parents are not rich. If my parents could pay for me, I would be embarrassed.

When my position was eliminated, I applied to every single job I could think of. Wal-mart, private ambulance, even food dietary services. I landed my current position the next day.

We also have a higher percentage of unemployment here and it's one of the worst in the state. Given the state of the economy, they need to realize that they may not be qualified for much more than the simple jobs.

She is also limiting her situation because of the guy she met about a month or two ago.
   
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Re: "Too good" for a job? - July 2nd 2013, 11:26 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarasa View Post
Both of the families are not in the position to pay for the kids. Their parents' credits are ruined and cannot even cosign a loan or get them an apartment. Their parents are not rich. If my parents could pay for me, I would be embarrassed.

When my position was eliminated, I applied to every single job I could think of. Wal-mart, private ambulance, even food dietary services. I landed my current position the next day.

We also have a higher percentage of unemployment here and it's one of the worst in the state. Given the state of the economy, they need to realize that they may not be qualified for much more than the simple jobs.

She is also limiting her situation because of the guy she met about a month or two ago.
Throughout undergrad, I worked part-time, $9 per hour, in a field that did not relate to my major. I received grants from my university, but I still had to find a way to pay for other costs, such as my rent, food, car expenses, etc. I am very grateful my father was able to support me while I worked hard to earn my degree, and I am not at all embarrassed that I relied on him (especially now, when I see all my friends with $50,000+ in student debt). As a graduate student, I continued to work part-time, I received grants from my university, and I depleted my savings in order to ensure I didn't have to rely on my father or take out loans.

I understand where you are coming from with regard to being a financially independent adult. At this stage in my life, I would not want to rely on my parents for financial support; however, I did rely on my father's support while completing my education as an undergraduate, and I am currently relying on my boyfriend's financial support (he is a registered nurse) while earning my thousands of hours that are required for licensure. I could work part-time in order to contribute toward rent, but then it would take me twice as long to become licensed (thus allowing me to bring in a significant amount of money)... so in my mind, there is nothing to be embarrassed about. This is a sound financial decision for us as a couple - which, of course, is different from the situations you're describing with your friends.

I believe some humility is necessary when searching for your first job - even when you have a degree. Yes, I think it's unfair that someone with a four-year degree should have to work at a fast food restaurant or other non-field-related position that offers minimum wage... but things are tough all around. If you're spending 40+ hours per week searching for that high-paying job, and you're not getting it after a few weeks, then you need to adjust your expectations. I can empathize with people who obtain four-year degrees, then can't find anything field-related aside from unpaid internships. Even then, though, it's possible to be a part-time intern while holding a part-time minimum wage job. I've had friends do this until their unpaid internships led to paying positions.





   
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