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Trying out online courses - December 28th 2017, 12:43 PM

I've seen a lot of people complaining about struggling at school, so I've thought about online courses to help you kinda get on the right track. I personally have nearly failed math, [Edited] I've collected as many free courses as possible [edited] so maybe It would save someone from dropping out.
A question I have is, do you have enough motivation?

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Re: Trying out online courses - December 28th 2017, 04:38 PM

The college/university experience is different for everyone, really. There are numerous factors that come into someone struggling with their classes, such as: mental health issues, their workplace being demanding or not as accommodating, family and/or friend issues. Sometimes, people cannot go to school right after completing high school, and the reasons listed could be why.

As for online classes, they may not be for everyone. However, if someone has a more demanding life (such as their employers not being as accommodating, having young children, a sick relative, etc) then an online class might be able to work for them. But for someone who gets distracted easily or require the extra accommodations that come with being in a class room (such as a sign language interpreter) then online classes would prove pointless, and a waste of time/money.

It really depends on that individual, what their life demands of them, and what works the best for them. I know I work best at an in-person environment as opposed to an online class, as convenient as online classes may be time and travel wise, it just does not work for me.
   
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Re: Trying out online courses - December 28th 2017, 05:05 PM

I agree with a lot that has been said, there are people who benefit from online courses and people who do not. My boyfriend preferred doing online classes for as many of his general education classes because he wasn't stuck sitting in a classroom and being lectured over stuff that bored him. Also, he was able to go at his own pace.

There are people that have disabilities and end up benefiting from those courses as well. There are a lot of online courses in my state that accommodate people with disabilities to a degree but those accommodations might not work for everyone. I have always been interested in trying online courses but have been worried that due to my own disabilities I would struggle. However, moving forward, I might end up trying out a few online courses just to see if I like them better.

People who are considering on-line classes should definitely talk to a counselor about the pros and cons and, if they have a disability, they should discuss what accommodations they would be provided with. I know that online courses are supposed to be accessible to all students but I am not sure how they go about doing that. I know at the college I went to that all online course material (videos and things like that) had to have closed captions or transcripts available but I am sure not all states/cities do this and so a person should discuss it with their counselor to get the best out of their education.


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Re: Trying out online courses - December 28th 2017, 06:52 PM

There are some places where you do online courses for free, like Coursera. They don't give you any accreditation from the institution itself, but you get a certificate showing you completed the course. Because they're free, one can do them just for interest's sake or as something to help with your university or school work. I did several free courses in economics when I was doing it at high school, which allowed me to basically master the entire high school curriculum in the space of three months. Thanks to that, I had more time to focus on maths and science. So, the online courses can definitely assist people who are struggling.

However, I agree that this is not a system for everyone. My university has experienced some disruptions over the past few years and resorted to putting out podcasts to complete the semesters. I find these podcasts very difficult to substitute for face to face lectures, even though it's almost exactly the same format as the stuff I did with Coursera. So, it works for some people in some areas and not for others.
   
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Re: Trying out online courses - December 28th 2017, 07:11 PM

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Originally Posted by Kyburg View Post
My university has experienced some disruptions over the past few years and resorted to putting out podcasts to complete the semesters.
That's ridiculous. What if there are hearing impaired students there? Doesn't sound very accommodating to me.

Also, to abibliophobe, Online Courses are supposed to have transcription/subtitle/plain text available according to the rules set forth by the ADA. However, not everyone does this. I've, unfortunately, have had this experience and lost my money over this ridiculous lack of accommodation.
   
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Re: Trying out online courses - December 28th 2017, 10:17 PM

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Originally Posted by Fernweh. View Post

That's ridiculous. What if there are hearing impaired students there? Doesn't sound very accommodating to me.

Also, to abibliophobe, Online Courses are supposed to have transcription/subtitle/plain text available according to the rules set forth by the ADA. However, not everyone does this. I've, unfortunately, have had this experience and lost my money over this ridiculous lack of accommodation.
I am aware that not all places follow the rules but because they are rules set forth by the ADA they can and do get into trouble for not following them. I have family that did a lot of work in regards to discrimination (they have also helped me deal with certain issues) and if a place does not follow the rules set out by the ADA they do have the potential to get in trouble. The issue is that a lot of the time these places know that the people they are refusing to accommodate aren't going to want to go through the process to get them into trouble (there are various reasons as to why one can't or won't .. too many to list) and, of course, different states have different rules and each institution can sometimes find loopholes.

This is why I said that people should discuss it with their counselor to make certain that they will be provided the appropriate accommodation/if the college is able to provide that accommodation. Most the time the college only has to be able to prove that they tried to reasonably accommodate people which is where some issues arise. If, for example, a counselor says a service will be provided and they don't end up providing it than they aren't reasonably accommodating a person and they misled the person into believing that the accommodation was available. This can lead to the institution facing complaints etc. Because of how complicated the laws are talking to a counselor is a good first step because they can explain the types of accommodations they are able to provide (online and on campus) and they will also should be able to provide the reasoning behind why they will not/are not providing a particular accommodation. Also, by talking to a counselor there should be documentation about the specific appointment which could help at a later date if they try and not provide an accommodation they said they would, initially. My disability counselor used to have to write down things we discussed in the appointment and I would have to sign acknowledging the discussion and I would be able to let him know if there was anything I wanted him to add in the documentation. I know that it's likely that different states/cities/colleges have different rules regarding documentation etc.

So, the issue about them not providing accommodations is quite complicated and I tried to stress that in my earlier post and I apologize if I did not. It's unfortunate that people who provide those services will sometimes take advantage of the fact that the laws pertaining to accommodations are complicated. I have had agencies try and not provide services but I was able to get help from the family member who does work pertaining to discrimination and knows the laws in our state and some of the federal laws. The family member I know is the one who stressed the importance of documenting things at college and when I start working because the more documentation the easier it can be to get things sorted. Although, the truth it it still isn't easy and places still get away with things like not providing accommodations/discriminating.






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