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RadioSerenade Offline
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Dylann Roof. - January 12th 2017, 03:38 AM

This thread has been labeled as triggering by the original poster or by a Moderator. Please take this into consideration before continuing to read.

Dylann Roof has been sentenced to death. I was wondering what your opinions are on the sentence in this case and the sentence more generally. I think the sentence in this case was not an injustice, because if the death penalty were used, it would be used here.

However, it is worth mentioning some of the injustices he was dealt:

1) Having a jury as opposed to an impartial, academic expert decide his sentence. These are the highest stakes in criminal law, and they cannot let people who know what they are doing, make the decision, probably because of the expense.

2) Having been paraded outside the court in front of waiting media, with the assumptions that a flimsy, oversized Kevlar vest would somehow do something for his safety (as opposed to just going out a back door in a protective van).

3) Being given the opportunity to defend himself in court during sentencing.

In the more general sense, the US is supposed to be a leader, and I am seriously wondering why they still have the death penalty.


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Re: Dylann Roof. - January 12th 2017, 04:19 AM

Why do we still have the death penalty? Dude... we just elected Donald Trump to be the president. Not everything has to make sense.
In my opinion, they shouldn't have given him the death penalty, for a few reasons.
1. I believe the death penalty should only be used when the government doesn't have the resources to permanently imprison someone. We have enough resources to hold more prisoners than China.
2. The idea that justice includes vengeance doesn't make sense to me. A prison rehabilitation system is supposed to rehabilitate people. Does it even matter when you're in prison for life? I suppose that's debatable. However, if vengeance is the main point, you would be better served knowing that a killer was getting the shit beaten out of him for the next 40 years.
3. The death penalty costs way more than life in prison.
I've never heard of the academic experts deciding the sentence. Is that an Australian thing?


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Re: Dylann Roof. - January 12th 2017, 01:01 PM

By academic experts, I meant commissioned judges.


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Re: Dylann Roof. - January 12th 2017, 05:04 PM

I see nothing wrong with the sentencing. The guy clearly showed no remorse nor want for rehabilitation, he got what was coming to him.

As for your "injustices" besides the parading him around thing, the rest are normal actions of the American justice system. The 6th Amendment of the US Constitution is as such:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amendment VI
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.
This provides the basis of how criminal courts work in the USA, and the various rights the accused has. Very clearly it says that the accused will be tried and sentenced by a jury of their peers, aka normal people. Judges were not used in the jury not because of laziness or expense, but because that simply isn't the way the justice system has worked for the last 240 years. There was no injustice regarding this in the Dylann Roof case.

Faretta v. California, U.S. Sup. Ct. 1975 details the right to represent yourself in court if you are capable of understanding the basics of the court. I wasn't following the Roof case very closely, but Roof did manage to prove himself capable. Was it a dumb choice? Yes, but he did have a right.
   
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Re: Dylann Roof. - January 13th 2017, 11:59 PM

I have always been opposed to the death penalty for several reasons, in this case I still don't think he should have been given it because a life is a life and we shouldn't take it. Even if he deserves it for what he did (Which he probably does) I also think that life in prison is way worse of a punishment therefore that's what I'd want for anyone who has done a crime similar to his or worse.


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Re: Dylann Roof. - January 14th 2017, 03:50 AM

I for one support the death penalty. I think in some cases, such as rape, child molestation or similar crimes it is justified.
While it is true that innocent people may be hurt through this, the fact remains, human beings need fear to control. If there is no fear of death, then they are willing to try crime. Also, often criminals get a better life in prison then what they had outside.
Just my two cents. I know this is controversial, and I'm sorry in case it offends/upsets anyone.


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Re: Dylann Roof. - January 15th 2017, 03:53 AM

I don't believe in death penalty. I dont believe in the way the prison is run in the USA. Even though this man committed a horrible horrible crime, I dont think throwing him in prison, probably where he's likely to be medically neglected, which right now might not mean much but lifelong prison means as an elderly, he will suffer from lack of health treatment including mental health treatment.

I do think there are possibilities for ways address crime, and holding the person accountable.

It's a bit weird because I usually talk about this in terms of people who are in prison for non-violent illegal activity, drug-related and/or regarding immigration related because they all get put into the same place, which sucks. Not all crimes have the same weight.

I am not sure how i feel about people who've committed violence, what their punishment should look like. So for someone like Dylan Roof ,who done something so violent, part of me wants to say "yeah he deserves to rot in hell" but part of me wants to stick to my principles even for this guy. Isolate him from society, but still give him humane treatment? There is no evidence that prisons work.
I am not saying his behavior is excused because it isn't. But he potentially has a mental illness and if he does indeed have a mental illness, he should get both treatment for it and the proper consequences for his actions-whatever that may look like.

I realize this is more of a theoretical-philosophical answer. I am in that kind of mood because recently i've been helping a fellow who's husband has a mental illness and is in prison for driving during a nervous breakdown. No one got injured but he was arrested and is being denied proper mental health treatment and I know it's a widely different circumstance but it got me thinking.

Last edited by ~Radio Flyer~; January 15th 2017 at 04:14 AM.
   
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