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  (#1 (permalink)) Old
Jess~ Offline
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Bring me home a black girl - December 9th 2017, 05:19 AM

For my class my professor assigned us journal entries, and one entry had to be done on this article titled, "Bring Me Home A Black Girl." He said it sounds racist at first, but as you read it, the author's argument starts to make sense. So I started reading it with a very open mind, and just kept waiting for the moment where it wouldn't be racist anymore. And then I finished the reading and was so angry I actually had tears in my eyes from the anger. Upon talking to my classmates the next day I realized that I wasn't the only one who thought that way.

I might explain my problems on it more later, but honestly, I don't have the energy for getting that pissed off all over again. I usually absolutely hate the articles he assigns for journal readings, and just skim through and get the gist of the reading. With THIS one, however, I read every single word and got more infuriated by the minute. As a white woman who has only ever dated black males, it was extremely hard to not take this personally.

I'd like some other opinions on it, because I just can't shake this goddamned article out of my mind, and it would be nice to discuss this with other people. I was so pissed off and emotionally charged by this article that I actually tried Googling more information about it, and came across a "debate" between the author and another woman. I will admit, the author seemed more down-to-earth than she did in her article, although that could be because she knew she had no argument besides an opinion. So I will link that debate as well.

This is the link to the pdf version of the article. If you don't trust links I have attached screenshots of the reading.
This is the link to the debate.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bmhbg1.jpg (19.4 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg bmhbg2.jpg (19.6 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg bmhbg3.jpg (20.0 KB, 4 views)


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Re: Bring me home a black girl - December 9th 2017, 06:45 AM

So your link didn't work and the screenshots were hard to read but I found it here: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1079871/posts

Ok so imo thinking about this in a perspective of what I've learned in my uni career, her point sounds really racist but is valid. Like, black women are one of the most devalued citizens in America because of the history of slavary and racism. So to me it makes sense that, although seemingly overtly racist, her message to her son would be to value and uphold black women rather than white women. I can't be too sure because I don't know the author's perspective, but I feel it could be interpreted as she just wants to teach her sons to value black women more and not just to say white is bad and whatever (although that can be argued). I guess the perspective I'm looking at it is in a POC lens.
Idk that's just my view on this.


THE POINT OF SINGULARITY IS NOTHING AS NOTHING BEGAN EVERYTHING
PULSING IN THE EXPAND CONSUME WITHOUT BARRIER OR BORDER
IT IS DARK BECAUSE IT IS THE DARKNESS IT IS OVER BECAUSE IT IS THE END
THERE IS NO SENTRY BECAUSE NONE DARE APPROACH
IT HAS NEVER BEEN AND IT IS ALL THAT EVER WAS
AT THE CENTER YOU DO NOT FIND THE ANSWER
YOU DO NOT FIND YOURSELF THERE IS NO CENTER AND THERE IS NO YOU THERE IS ONLY MADNESS
WE ARE ALL HERE NOW.
WE ARE ALL HERE.
WE ARE.

   
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Re: Bring me home a black girl - December 9th 2017, 06:27 PM

This was an interesting read, but I must agree that I find it completely racist, though maybe that is just my white male perspective speaking. However, I feel there are several major issues in this argument.

Firstly, she places a lot of emphasis on marriage, when cohabitation without marriage is actually becoming the new norm in the US according to this article:
http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor...abitating.html. Thus, I would like to know what the statistics are for all cohabiting partners and whether this has an effect on the numbers she has put out. However, her emphasis on marriage is still incorrect, as this perpetuates the myth that one cannot have a happy family without it.

Secondly, she speaks about the need to ensure that her sons know that they may not marry white women. I'm sorry, but what gives a parent the right to tell their children who they can marry? This is almost abusive in reinforcing something without allowing their child to discover for themselves. This insane requirement to marry within one's own race is reminiscent of the days in the US when blatantly racist laws outlawed relationships between black and white persons, or the Mixed Marriages and Immorality Acts of South African Apartheid which had the same effect. It was ludicrously ridiculed back then, but she is trying to hold that kind of discrimination as paramount now. Furthermore, if people are forced to marry someone of their own race despite being in love with someone else, it will contribute to unhappy families, divorces, and broken homes because one (or both) partners are unsatisfied in the relationship.

Thirdly, and this is where the racism comes in, she is classifying people based on the color of their skin, which is unacceptable. As she points out, there is nothing wrong with wanting to be with someone who looks like you and is part of your culture, but there is everything wrong with telling someone they can't be with someone purely because their skin is a different color.

Fourthly, she speaks about "black culture" and "the black community". What are these? What gives her the right to say what these are?

Fifthly, she states close to the end of her article that black women are more likely than any other group to remain without a partner. She doesn't directly cite any authority on this, though it could possibly come from her earlier authority. However, if it does not, then that significantly weakens her point, as she is asserting an opinion as a fact. In a similar vein, she justifies her focus on her male children because they are more likely to marry women of other groups. However, most of her arguments about keeping things in the community should surely apply to black women as well? But she chooses to focus exclusively on black men, while ignoring the wife of the white publisher without any form of rebuke for marrying outside of her community, instead congratulating her for ensuring her sons marry black women. Instead, she focuses on men as the most important aspect in any relationship. This smacks of double standards at best, and dangerous male-primacy in relationships at worst.

Sixthly, the whole language of the article is racist, filled with terms like "marrying white" and describing how a wealthy black man marrying a white women is like him "laying his riches at her feet" almost as if there could be no other reason for their desire to get married than for her to take his money. This racist attitude needs to be examined a criticized wherever it crops up.

The article does make an important points about the "whitewashing" of popular culture and the need to teach one's children that they are beautiful for who they are, not because they look like some pop icon. However, this can be done without needing to denigrate one group in favour of another, which ignores the essential message of teaching our children that they are beautiful because of who they are inside, not on the outside. I wonder how she feels about the girls of all races who are driven to various eating disorders by our society's mad obsession with thinness and whether she would make such a vehement argument for positive role models for them.

Anyway, that's my 2c. Tldr: I agree with OP, it's blatantly racist and doesn't rescue itself.
   
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