TeenHelp
Support Forums Today's Posts

Get Advice Connect with TeenHelp Resources
HelpLINK Facebook     Twitter     Tumblr     Instagram    Hotlines    Safety Zone    Alternatives

You are not registered or have not logged in

Hello guest! (Not a guest? Log in above!)

As a guest on TeenHelp you are only able to use some of our site's features. By registering an account you will be able to enjoy unlimited access to our site, and will be able to:

  • Connect with thousands of teenagers worldwide by actively taking part in our Support Forums and Chat Room.
  • Find others with similar interests in our Social Groups.
  • Express yourself through our Blogs, Picture Albums and User Profiles.
  • And much much more!

Signing up is free, anonymous and will only take a few moments, so click here to register now!


Anxiety This forum is for seeking advice on anxiety and stress related issues.

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  (#1 (permalink)) Old
Chimera Offline
Member
Welcome me, I'm new!
*
 
Chimera's Avatar
 
Name: Hestia
Gender: Female

Posts: 12
Join Date: August 3rd 2017

Unsure what this is - any advice? - August 24th 2017, 11:36 AM

I've always been a worrier, however I fear that it has started to grow into something more serious, and it is negatively impacting my life. I worry about the smallest, most stupid things, like opening doors, talking to cashiers, finding stuff in the supermarket by myself. I can't eat in front of other people - the other day, my driving instructor suggested an intensive all day lesson, which would have been really beneficial but I turned it down because I didn't want to eat lunch with him.

This also has caused a massive deal of self consciousness, and I am constantly stressed that someone will be judging me or watching me - I won't even use my phone to read the news in public for fear someone will judge me for it. This also weirdly causes me to talk to myself I,e, telling myself what I'm doing or giving a weird running commentary, which obviously makes me seem weirder to the people around me, especially as it's just slightly under my breath, so only noticeable if you're near me.

I've done some research into symptoms of anxiety, and one stood out to me particularly - sensory overload. Several times in class I have become overwhelmed by people talking or making noise, and felt on the verge of tears or like I need to get out. I also get incredibly nervous when I am put in a position which may even slightly mean breaking the rules, for example walking a short way on land that may or may not mean I was trespassing. I got a tight feeling in my chest, fast heartbeat and felt almost sick - and this might not have even been trespassing.

Apologies this has been rather rambling, I hope it makes some sense. I would appreciate any advice on this at all. Oddly, I don't find meeting new people, public speaking or things like that hard, I may be a little shy but I normally handle myself very well. Anyway thank you for reading, sorry this is long, and thanks in advance for any comments!
   
  (#2 (permalink)) Old
Concinnity Offline
Go gold.
Not a n00b
**
 
Concinnity's Avatar
 
Name: Hailey
Age: 21
Gender: Female
Location: California

Posts: 72
Join Date: August 9th 2017

Re: Unsure what this is - any advice? - August 25th 2017, 05:17 AM

Hey there! Honestly, I relate to a lot of what you're describing, and I'm really sorry that you've been going through this. Anxiety can make "normal" everyday tasks feel so, so difficult, and that's a really hard thing to experience.

Have you thought about seeing a therapist or counselor about this? I'm not sure how old you are, but if you're in middle/high school, you can probably speak to your school counselor. If you're in college, you may be able to access free counseling services! I saw a therapist on my campus for anxiety this past year and I found it to be so, so helpful, so I'd highly recommend that if you're able to. Even just talking about it with someone can help a lot, and they may be able to help you figure out some coping methods to make it easier to manage. Additionally, seeing a therapist (or your doctor) opens up the possibility of medication, if that's deemed necessary!

If you're unable to talk to someone, you might find it helpful to try journaling, meditation (there are great apps for this, like the Breathe app, that talk you through it), or listening to music in your headphones while you go about your daily tasks! Working out has also been shown to help anxiety a lot, even if just temporarily.

Anxiety is such a tough thing to deal with in your daily life, and I really hope it improves for you soon! Best of luck.


"Chase your stars, fool. Life is short."

   
  (#3 (permalink)) Old
del677 Offline
Member
Experienced TeenHelper
******
 
del677's Avatar
 

Posts: 516
Join Date: December 28th 2016

Re: Unsure what this is - any advice? - August 25th 2017, 08:52 AM

Sounds like the anxiety part of the brain has become a bit overactive. Once the Sympathetic Nervous System gets activated ("Fight or Flight"), it tends to take over and shut down the rational thinking part of the mind.

(This worked great when we were being chased by tigers. It's horrible nowadays where there are no tigers chasing us anymore.)

Once that anxiety part of the mind gets going, it's a self-sustaining spiral of reinforcement. We become afraid of everything, even things which don't make any sense to be afraid of, because it's not the rational thinking part of the brain that's afraid, it's the more primitive emotional part of the brain, and that part of the brain doesn't think rationally, it just thinks emotionally, and it starts thinking fear, and switches on the body's Sympathetic Nervous System, and we're pretty much screwed from there on.

The trick is to try and activate the body's Parasympathetic Nervous System, which is the opposite. You can research ways to do that. There are some mind exercises that can help achieve this. They take a bit of practice but it's a talent that can be learned and strengthened with practice. Try mindfulness, meditation, qi-gong, look for some qi-gong exercises on youtube. Very simple ones, like slowly moving your hands apart and back together again. It forces one to focus on the slow movement of their hands, because moving our hands that slowly is unnatural for us, and it's that focusing of the mind on the task which eventually strengthens certain parts of the brain which has the wonderful side effect of reducing stress and anxiety, or at least giving us more choice on whether we will react rationally or emotionally.

Overstimulation is definitely a problem in modern day society. We need to take breaks from this, find a quiet place where we can experience peace and calm for a while. And we need to avoid as much as possible places that trigger us, or overstimulate us, or cause us stress.

(There may also be medication that can help if the problem is the filter part of the brain isn't doing it's job filtering out everything that's irrelevant. Then we end up experiencing and processing everything, which can be overwhelming, or it makes us appear hyperactive. So doctors prescribe stimulants, which at first sounds like the opposite of a logical thing to do if someone appears hyperactive. It makes sense once we understand it's not hyperactivity, it's the brain's filter is underactive and needs stimulating to get it functioning again. Once it functions again, and starts filtering out all the irrelevant stuff, then we aren't overwhelmed anymore and we can focus on whatever it is we need to focus on like normal people.)

I'm not sure about the talking to oneself. That might be since the anxiety part of the mind is overactive, it's shutting down the rational thinking part of the mind, and the rational thinking part of the mind is having trouble thinking and functioning, so it's resorting to verbal talking to get what it's thinking across to the rest of the brain. It's trying to compensate for this overstimulation that's causing so much noise in the mind, so verbally talking is a way to try to be heard over all this noise activity it's competing with. Just a guess though.
   
  (#4 (permalink)) Old
Chimera Offline
Member
Welcome me, I'm new!
*
 
Chimera's Avatar
 
Name: Hestia
Gender: Female

Posts: 12
Join Date: August 3rd 2017

Re: Unsure what this is - any advice? - August 26th 2017, 08:55 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Concinnity View Post
Hey there! Honestly, I relate to a lot of what you're describing, and I'm really sorry that you've been going through this. Anxiety can make "normal" everyday tasks feel so, so difficult, and that's a really hard thing to experience.

Have you thought about seeing a therapist or counselor about this? I'm not sure how old you are, but if you're in middle/high school, you can probably speak to your school counselor. If you're in college, you may be able to access free counseling services! I saw a therapist on my campus for anxiety this past year and I found it to be so, so helpful, so I'd highly recommend that if you're able to. Even just talking about it with someone can help a lot, and they may be able to help you figure out some coping methods to make it easier to manage. Additionally, seeing a therapist (or your doctor) opens up the possibility of medication, if that's deemed necessary!

If you're unable to talk to someone, you might find it helpful to try journaling, meditation (there are great apps for this, like the Breathe app, that talk you through it), or listening to music in your headphones while you go about your daily tasks! Working out has also been shown to help anxiety a lot, even if just temporarily.

Anxiety is such a tough thing to deal with in your daily life, and I really hope it improves for you soon! Best of luck.
I'm going to college this year so I might talk someone about it then if it continues. I was always wary before because I guess I didn't believe it was a real problem, and also my parents probably wouldn't either (they're great people I just wasn't sure how they'd react as they are quite old fashioned in that sense)

Those tips are very helpful, I'll try them out!

Thank you very much!
   
  (#5 (permalink)) Old
Chimera Offline
Member
Welcome me, I'm new!
*
 
Chimera's Avatar
 
Name: Hestia
Gender: Female

Posts: 12
Join Date: August 3rd 2017

Re: Unsure what this is - any advice? - August 26th 2017, 08:56 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by del677 View Post
Sounds like the anxiety part of the brain has become a bit overactive. Once the Sympathetic Nervous System gets activated ("Fight or Flight"), it tends to take over and shut down the rational thinking part of the mind.

(This worked great when we were being chased by tigers. It's horrible nowadays where there are no tigers chasing us anymore.)

Once that anxiety part of the mind gets going, it's a self-sustaining spiral of reinforcement. We become afraid of everything, even things which don't make any sense to be afraid of, because it's not the rational thinking part of the brain that's afraid, it's the more primitive emotional part of the brain, and that part of the brain doesn't think rationally, it just thinks emotionally, and it starts thinking fear, and switches on the body's Sympathetic Nervous System, and we're pretty much screwed from there on.

The trick is to try and activate the body's Parasympathetic Nervous System, which is the opposite. You can research ways to do that. There are some mind exercises that can help achieve this. They take a bit of practice but it's a talent that can be learned and strengthened with practice. Try mindfulness, meditation, qi-gong, look for some qi-gong exercises on youtube. Very simple ones, like slowly moving your hands apart and back together again. It forces one to focus on the slow movement of their hands, because moving our hands that slowly is unnatural for us, and it's that focusing of the mind on the task which eventually strengthens certain parts of the brain which has the wonderful side effect of reducing stress and anxiety, or at least giving us more choice on whether we will react rationally or emotionally.

Overstimulation is definitely a problem in modern day society. We need to take breaks from this, find a quiet place where we can experience peace and calm for a while. And we need to avoid as much as possible places that trigger us, or overstimulate us, or cause us stress.

(There may also be medication that can help if the problem is the filter part of the brain isn't doing it's job filtering out everything that's irrelevant. Then we end up experiencing and processing everything, which can be overwhelming, or it makes us appear hyperactive. So doctors prescribe stimulants, which at first sounds like the opposite of a logical thing to do if someone appears hyperactive. It makes sense once we understand it's not hyperactivity, it's the brain's filter is underactive and needs stimulating to get it functioning again. Once it functions again, and starts filtering out all the irrelevant stuff, then we aren't overwhelmed anymore and we can focus on whatever it is we need to focus on like normal people.)

I'm not sure about the talking to oneself. That might be since the anxiety part of the mind is overactive, it's shutting down the rational thinking part of the mind, and the rational thinking part of the mind is having trouble thinking and functioning, so it's resorting to verbal talking to get what it's thinking across to the rest of the brain. It's trying to compensate for this overstimulation that's causing so much noise in the mind, so verbally talking is a way to try to be heard over all this noise activity it's competing with. Just a guess though.
Thank you very much for this, it's both enlightening and very helpful!
   
  (#6 (permalink)) Old
del677 Offline
Member
Experienced TeenHelper
******
 
del677's Avatar
 

Posts: 516
Join Date: December 28th 2016

Re: Unsure what this is - any advice? - August 26th 2017, 09:41 AM

Colleges often have good counselors available for the students, because the college wants their students to do well (it makes them look good), and they know a lot of students have these kinds of problems, so they make counseling services available to their students, and they're usually pretty good.

Sometimes younger people who want to train to be counselors will counsel for free for the experience. (I think they have to get 3000 hours of experience before they can get licensed, so there's a lot of really good young counselors giving away 3000 hours so they can get licensed. I'm not sure if 3000 is the correct number, because that sounds like quite a lot!)

Anyway hope your college has some good resources!

(Plus college is better than high school in my opinion, as the students tend to be smarter and brighter and more mature.)
   
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Tags
advice, unsure

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All material copyright 1998-2018, TeenHelp.
Terms | Legal | Privacy | Conduct | Complaints

Powered by vBulletin®.
Copyright ©2000-2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search engine optimization by vBSEO.
Theme developed in association with vBStyles.