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University... - July 4th 2009, 05:30 PM

a) What kind of factors should I look for in a university? Which factors should be most important whilst making my decision? (i.e., amount in scholarship money, distance from home, campus life, residences, programs, cost, prestige, etc.)


b) What is better - going to a low-ranked university and getting a lot in scholarship money or going to a high-ranked university and getting little in scholarship money?


c) Should I consider staying in town for university? Will this help me save money for future goals (i.e., studying in the UK, graduate school/law school, etc.)?


d) I want to make a chart with all of the universities that Iím considering. What factors should be included in this chart?


e) How do I begin to narrow down universities and programs? There are a couple of programs that Iím interested - even at the same university. For instance, I like four different programs at the University of Windsor. I donít know. I donít really want to spend $1,000 applying to universities. Even aside from the monetary inefficiency, having a lot of acceptances will make my decision that much more difficult.


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Re: University... - July 4th 2009, 06:40 PM

My answers are in bold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
a) What kind of factors should I look for in a university? Which factors should be most important whilst making my decision? (i.e., amount in scholarship money, distance from home, campus life, residences, programs, cost, prestige, etc.)
It depends first on whether you plan to go onto graduate school or not. If you do, then bare in mind you can transfer to a different university mid-way through your undergrad. if you so choose. For the facts, I considered the price, whether or not they offered the courses and programs I was interested in, the distance from home (and consequently the cost for residence) and how the campus itself appealed to me. I didn't factor the prestige in that much because if I needed to, I could have done my first two or so years at a dumpy place, got higher marks then gone off to a prestigious one later. Scholarship money I wasn't as interested in either because all of the places would offer me some scholarship money. We weren't very tight on money so it also would not have mattered too much for financial reasons. Also look for the diversity of courses that are offered so if you want to branch out, ensure you're able to do so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
b) What is better - going to a low-ranked university and getting a lot in scholarship money or going to a high-ranked university and getting little in scholarship money?
Ignore the rankings. If the university has what you want then that's a reason why you should go for it. If the high-ranked one doesn't have programs that interest you, then why go there? Same goes for the low-ranked one.

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Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
c) Should I consider staying in town for university? Will this help me save money for future goals (i.e., studying in the UK, graduate school/law school, etc.)?
Living off-campus at home would be the cheapest route and would save money in the future. Living off-campus but not at home (i.e. apartment) may or may not be cheaper than residence. Some places it may, some it may not. But if you're worried about saving money, then live at home. Do bare in mind, if you live far away, then you must factor in the transportation. Myself, I usually get my parents to drive me to a near-by train station, hop on the train, hop on a bus and the bus takes me straight into campus. The bus happily I may very little for (about $80 or so per year to ride anywhere in that city for free).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
d) I want to make a chart with all of the universities that Iím considering. What factors should be included in this chart?
I factored in whether the university offered what I wanted, the price for at home living or on-residence living, distance from home, how the campus appealed to me and very little for the prestige of the university. Also, consider the possibility that you change your mind completely, then do you need to change universities also?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
e) How do I begin to narrow down universities and programs? There are a couple of programs that Iím interested - even at the same university. For instance, I like four different programs at the University of Windsor. I donít know. I donít really want to spend $1,000 applying to universities. Even aside from the monetary inefficiency, having a lot of acceptances will make my decision that much more difficult.
In first year, don't bother to make a choice for your major, minor or specialist programs. It's not required (I assume it's not required at Windsor also) so take a diverse amount and types of courses. I think this still may apply to Windsor as some of my friends at other universities said it does: you need at least 1.0 credits in science, 1.0 in humanities and 1.0 in social sciences. First year is a great time to get this done and to just branch out and take something else.

I got accepted to many places but for me, I wanted to spend as little as possible, get into a good university that appealed to me and my courses. But one other thing I considered was if I went for something completely different, then would I need to change universities? For me, I don't: my university has 3 campuses so if I want to go into something else that my current campus doesn't offer, then I can easily go to one other one which is the biggest of the lot (third one is too far to travel to daily).
   
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Re: University... - July 4th 2009, 06:49 PM

I'm assuming you go to either UofT - Scarborough or UofT - Mississauga?

Also, the issue is that every university has what I want. I want to do one of the following: 1) Major in Psychology 2) Double Major in Psychology and Philosophy 3) Major in Psychology, Minor in Philosophy. I am not completely sure yet. However, from my knowledge, I could do this at any university - which is why I'm having such a difficult time making a decision regarding this.

I think UofT onl y has B.Sc. Psychology, which I don't want. However it is notorious for their Philosophy program and their Trinity One program - which I am interested in as well. I think it's safe to say that I won't end up at UofT because 1) it doesn't offer the Psychology I'm interested in 2) It's a GPA killer, from what I've heard.


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Re: University... - July 4th 2009, 11:21 PM

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I'm assuming you go to either UofT - Scarborough or UofT - Mississauga?

Also, the issue is that every university has what I want. I want to do one of the following: 1) Major in Psychology 2) Double Major in Psychology and Philosophy 3) Major in Psychology, Minor in Philosophy. I am not completely sure yet. However, from my knowledge, I could do this at any university - which is why I'm having such a difficult time making a decision regarding this.

I think UofT onl y has B.Sc. Psychology, which I don't want. However it is notorious for their Philosophy program and their Trinity One program - which I am interested in as well. I think it's safe to say that I won't end up at UofT because 1) it doesn't offer the Psychology I'm interested in 2) It's a GPA killer, from what I've heard.
Heh, UofT isn't the easiest university to give a high GPA you're right on that but it does provide a wonderful experience for learning. Are you more interested in learning or simply a high GPA? It's not unheard of though to have a high GPA at UofT but if you put your nose to the grinding stone, you can get a high GPA. If you want a high GPA, then go to any dumpy place and a half-assed try would get you a decent GPA.

I go to UTM, athough I may take some courses at St. George. UTM doesn't offer a BSc but rather Honours BSc, Honours BA, etc... . In fact, the requirements for the program use the requirements for HBSc, HBA, HBCom and such. I assume St.George would have the same.

Philosophy and psychology are programs that are offered pretty much everywhere, although the specific focus for psychology differs (I don't know about philosophy but I do know about psychology from first-hand experience).

UofT (downtown) is a bit limited for abnormal psychology and other fields if that's what you're interested in but UTM has more on that. I don't know about Scarborough, as it's somewhat distanced itself from UTM and St.George.

What is the specific focus you may want in psychology?

From looking through the academic calender (which you can do online), for UTM, minor in philosophy has no cGPA requirements, other than having a cGPA that puts you in good-standing.

Major and minor in psychology both have a cGPA requirement of 2.0 which is piss easy to get.
   
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Re: University... - July 4th 2009, 11:32 PM

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Heh, UofT isn't the easiest university to give a high GPA you're right on that but it does provide a wonderful experience for learning. Are you more interested in learning or simply a high GPA? It's not unheard of though to have a high GPA at UofT but if you put your nose to the grinding stone, you can get a high GPA. If you want a high GPA, then go to any dumpy place and a half-assed try would get you a decent GPA.

I go to UTM, athough I may take some courses at St. George. UTM doesn't offer a BSc but rather Honours BSc, Honours BA, etc... . In fact, the requirements for the program use the requirements for HBSc, HBA, HBCom and such. I assume St.George would have the same.

Philosophy and psychology are programs that are offered pretty much everywhere, although the specific focus for psychology differs (I don't know about philosophy but I do know about psychology from first-hand experience).

UofT (downtown) is a bit limited for abnormal psychology and other fields if that's what you're interested in but UTM has more on that. I don't know about Scarborough, as it's somewhat distanced itself from UTM and St.George.

What is the specific focus you may want in psychology?

From looking through the academic calender (which you can do online), for UTM, minor in philosophy has no cGPA requirements, other than having a cGPA that puts you in good-standing.

Major and minor in psychology both have a cGPA requirement of 2.0 which is piss easy to get.

Problem: I don't want to do a B.Sc. (Hons) but rather a B.A. (Hons). If I'm not mistaken, UofT only offers a B.Sc. That's the problem. If I were to go to UofT, I'd probably go to UTM.

I'm interested in social psychology/clinical psychology. Does clinical psychology require a lot of science? One of the options that I'm considering is going to graduate school to become a clinical psychologist.


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Re: University... - July 4th 2009, 11:58 PM

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I don’t know. I don’t really want to spend $1,000 applying to universities. Even aside from the monetary inefficiency, having a lot of acceptances will make my decision that much more difficult.
You listed an Ontario university there, so I just thought I'd put this, not sure if it applies.When you're applying to Ontario universities you can use OUAC (Ontario Universities Application Centre). Ontario has so many universities that students from the province just fill out one application on the OUAC website, and specify which universities they want their application to be sent to. They have one form for Ontario students, and another for all other Canadians. They make it very affordable - you apply to 3 universities/programs in Ontario for $105, and every university/program in Ontario after that is an additional $35. If you're an Ontario student, I think guidance counsellors are automatically supposed to give you this info (and your OUAC pin) but if not, you could ask a guidance counsellor.

It wouldn't necessarily help the problem of lots of acceptance, but it is affordable to apply in Ontario.


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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 12:08 AM

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You listed an Ontario university there, so I just thought I'd put this, not sure if it applies.When you're applying to Ontario universities you can use OUAC (Ontario Universities Application Centre). Ontario has so many universities that students from the province just fill out one application on the OUAC website, and specify which universities they want their application to be sent to. They have one form for Ontario students, and another for all other Canadians. They make it very affordable - you apply to 3 universities/programs in Ontario for $105, and every university/program in Ontario after that is an additional $35. If you're an Ontario student, I think guidance counsellors are automatically supposed to give you this info (and your OUAC pin) but if not, you could ask a guidance counsellor.

It wouldn't necessarily help the problem of lots of acceptance, but it is affordable to apply in Ontario.
Yeah that's definitely something I like about Ontario - they have OUAC. The guidance department at my school is not the greatest. This year, they gave out the OUAC pin numbers to students two months after they received them.

Nonetheless, OUAC is a pretty great thing. The problem is that when it comes to certain universities, like UWindsor for example, there may be three or four different programs that I'd like to apply to - which requires four different fees ($35x4).

Also question: There are some programs where you can apply to double major: Psychology and Philosophy, let's say. What's the difference between applying to it and entering it from the start of 1st year and declaring the second major after first year or something?

What I'm trying to say, simply: Would it be a waste to apply to the same university for 1) Psychology 2) Psychology and Philosophy because if I were to want to do #2, I could always do that for second year?


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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 12:57 AM

From my experience, when you're entering university, you don't immediately apply to majors - you apply to faculties. So you'd apply to arts faculties, science faculties, business faculties etc. You don't immediately declare your major within the faculty (eg psychology) - the university I'm at you don't declare a major until 3rd year. When I was applying to Ontario universities, you don't even tell the university what you're planning to major in. If you're thinking of doing a degree in philosophy, you'd apply to the faculty of arts at whatever university.


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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 01:38 AM

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From my experience, when you're entering university, you don't immediately apply to majors - you apply to faculties. So you'd apply to arts faculties, science faculties, business faculties etc. You don't immediately declare your major within the faculty (eg psychology) - the university I'm at you don't declare a major until 3rd year. When I was applying to Ontario universities, you don't even tell the university what you're planning to major in. If you're thinking of doing a degree in philosophy, you'd apply to the faculty of arts at whatever university.
I looked at my friend's OUAC account and when you're applying to university, the majority of them ask you to choose the program you're applying to - and not just the faculty. I do know that there is only like one or two pre-requisite courses in first year for your major. For example, I think there's only one core psychology course in first year at the majority of universities - Intro To Psych.


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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 01:44 AM

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Problem: I don't want to do a B.Sc. (Hons) but rather a B.A. (Hons). If I'm not mistaken, UofT only offers a B.Sc. That's the problem. If I were to go to UofT, I'd probably go to UTM.

I'm interested in social psychology/clinical psychology. Does clinical psychology require a lot of science? One of the options that I'm considering is going to graduate school to become a clinical psychologist.
It would depend on the specialty of the clinical psychology. For clinical neuropsychology, then definately you need science but for something like abnormal psychology not from a biological paradigm, you'd still need some science regardless but probably not as much. But there would still be science needed regardless of what field of clinical psychology you do.

Also, graduate school requires graduate statistics as well as undergrad. stats which is not too difficult. You'd either end up with a PhD or a PsyD. A PsyD focuses more on clinical work, less on research and PhD is the opposite.

As Grizabella said, there's no point in apply for your major and such in first year. I initially enrolled for chemical and physical sciences but now flopped over to double major biology and psychology and considering adding on a minor statistics. So once you get in, you can flop around as you please.

All majors and such have a criteria to meet, so if you apply before first year, you may get it but since you haven't done anything, you could be booted out later. The requirements generally are not hard to get: get at least 4.0 credits, have certain courses completed and a certain cGPA. Some get more picky and they want a minimum mark on a specific course, such as for the major in psychology wants at least 63% in first-year psych where specialist in psychology wants at least 77% in first-year psych. If you apply in different years, then there are different criteria but it's not too different as if there is a cGPA needed, then that remains the same.

If you get in 1 major at the beginning, then that will have no impact on getting another providing it doesn't slam your mark down the shitter. For me, I'm in double major bio. and psych. There is some overlap in some courses but getting into bio. doesn't effect getting into psych. The only time it would affect is if you'd end up exceeding the limit, such as having a triple major at once.

I know it can be expensive to apply so what I did was apply to one program that interested me. If I wanted to change, then I could once I was in.
   
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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 03:11 AM

Quote:
I looked at my friend's OUAC account and when you're applying to university, the majority of them ask you to choose the program you're applying to - and not just the faculty. I do know that there is only like one or two pre-requisite courses in first year for your major. For example, I think there's only one core psychology course in first year at the majority of universities - Intro To Psych.
They'll ask what program you're interested in, but really, it doesn't matter when you're going from grade 12 to first year. If you say on your application you're interested in philosophy, that's by no means written in stone. Once you're in a faculty, it's usually not super difficult to change your program - you might lack a couple courses, in which case if you decide to change, you can usually catch up with summer courses. Switching faculties might be more difficult. For example if I suddenly decided I don't want to be an Arts major, but wanted to get a science degree, that might be a bit harder, because I don't have many science credits and would have a lot of catching up to do. But although it is still difficult, it's not impossible. That might take a bit of the pressure off - even if you do ultimately pick the wrong program, you can always switch.


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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 03:20 AM

My prospective majors would only be Psychology and Philosophy...but Psychology for sure. So you're saying it would make sense to apply to Psychology to all of the universities of my choice and if I want to add a second major or perhaps a minor, I'll do so.

All of the potential programs that I would want are in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Social Sciences - both of which are fairly similar and are usually bundled up under the same faculty anyway. That makes much more sense, undoubtedly.


Another question for the two of you: What are you opinions on co-op?


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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 05:58 AM

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My prospective majors would only be Psychology and Philosophy...but Psychology for sure. So you're saying it would make sense to apply to Psychology to all of the universities of my choice and if I want to add a second major or perhaps a minor, I'll do so.
Exactly. But don't get too anxious about applying before you finish first-year. You can add other programs too but depending on the year you add them, you'll need slightly different requirements.

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Another question for the two of you: What are you opinions on co-op?
I think they can be beneficial especially if they involve the areas that you're interested in studying.
   
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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 05:46 PM

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I think they can be beneficial especially if they involve the areas that you're interested in studying.
In terms of possible co-op, I'd study at Waterloo or Guelph for that. Both are great schools, I hear. Do you think it is a good idea to do co-op? There is Psychology Co-op at both schools.


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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 10:10 PM

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In terms of possible co-op, I'd study at Waterloo or Guelph for that. Both are great schools, I hear. Do you think it is a good idea to do co-op? There is Psychology Co-op at both schools.
It's up to you if you want to do co-op. I haven't had much experience with it so I wouldn't be the best person to ask. Both are great universities.

If you haven't already done so, pick up a Macleans magazine (or look for it online) and they give a break-down for various categories for most universities and colleges in Canada. They also give a brief outline of each university I believe, so you could use that to help you decide which one to go for.
   
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Re: University... - July 5th 2009, 10:14 PM

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It's up to you if you want to do co-op. I haven't had much experience with it so I wouldn't be the best person to ask. Both are great universities.

If you haven't already done so, pick up a Macleans magazine (or look for it online) and they give a break-down for various categories for most universities and colleges in Canada. They also give a brief outline of each university I believe, so you could use that to help you decide which one to go for.
I have actually picked up both Macleans magazines. It's just that there is so much information. All universities have so much to offer. I'd like to make a chart or something including the most important factors...so I can begin to narrow down my options just a little bit but I'm having a great deal of trouble coming up with these factors.

Also, do you have MSN by any chance? If so, would you mind PMing me your email address, if you don't want to post it publicly on the forums? :P


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Re: University... - July 6th 2009, 09:37 PM

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a) What kind of factors should I look for in a university? Which factors should be most important whilst making my decision? (i.e., amount in scholarship money, distance from home, campus life, residences, programs, cost, prestige, etc.)


b) What is better - going to a low-ranked university and getting a lot in scholarship money or going to a high-ranked university and getting little in scholarship money?


c) Should I consider staying in town for university? Will this help me save money for future goals (i.e., studying in the UK, graduate school/law school, etc.)?


d) I want to make a chart with all of the universities that Iím considering. What factors should be included in this chart?


e) How do I begin to narrow down universities and programs? There are a couple of programs that Iím interested - even at the same university. For instance, I like four different programs at the University of Windsor. I donít know. I donít really want to spend $1,000 applying to universities. Even aside from the monetary inefficiency, having a lot of acceptances will make my decision that much more difficult.
A) Whatever is most important to you. Obviously there are a million factors, so you have to base the decision on what is important to you. Do you want to see your family often? Do you want to drive or fly or what? Do you want a drinking campus or no? We can't answer these kinds of questions for you.

B) In my opinion, this depends upon how much of it you'll have to pay. Its an investment, and you have to gauge whether you think the investment in a better school is worth it.

C) Yes, you should consider every possibility. Thinking ahead is smart too.

D) Whatever factors are important to you. I recommend an Excel spreadsheet.

E) Limit yourself to only the most appealing ones unless you are worried you wont get in. I applied to seven, though I could easily see applying to ten.



   
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Re: University... - July 6th 2009, 09:48 PM

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A) Whatever is most important to you. Obviously there are a million factors, so you have to base the decision on what is important to you. Do you want to see your family often? Do you want to drive or fly or what? Do you want a drinking campus or no? We can't answer these kinds of questions for you.

B) In my opinion, this depends upon how much of it you'll have to pay. Its an investment, and you have to gauge whether you think the investment in a better school is worth it.

C) Yes, you should consider every possibility. Thinking ahead is smart too.

D) Whatever factors are important to you. I recommend an Excel spreadsheet.

E) Limit yourself to only the most appealing ones unless you are worried you wont get in. I applied to seven, though I could easily see applying to ten.
Thanks. [:

You said you applied to seven. Are you Canadian? I would never be able to apply to only seven in the USA.

Out of curiosity, what would be the best way to make the chart using Excel?


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Re: University... - July 7th 2009, 03:56 AM

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I have actually picked up both Macleans magazines. It's just that there is so much information. All universities have so much to offer. I'd like to make a chart or something including the most important factors...so I can begin to narrow down my options just a little bit but I'm having a great deal of trouble coming up with these factors.

Also, do you have MSN by any chance? If so, would you mind PMing me your email address, if you don't want to post it publicly on the forums? :P
Some obvious factors are prices (for living on campus and at home), transportation (if at home or near-by), the amount of courses that interest you, how much the campus appeals to you and their diversity for other courses in case you wish to switch to something else.

What I ended up doing was making a chart of these and a few other factors and giving each one a ranking from 0-10, 0 being the shits, 10 being the best. Afterwards, I added up the totals and looked for which ones had the highest scores. I think it was then between Waterloo, Western and UofT. I initially had Guelph but I opted not to go for that one. For me, I was looking for something that would put the least amount of stress on me while I was doing the courses. For me, this was the distance from home because I knew I could get pretty good food, not have to worry about room-mates, etc... .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canuck View Post

Out of curiosity, what would be the best way to make the chart using Excel?
Make the universities go down in columns and the factors go as rows so it makes a two-way table.
   
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Re: University... - July 8th 2009, 02:20 PM

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Originally Posted by Canuck View Post
a) What kind of factors should I look for in a university? Which factors should be most important whilst making my decision? (i.e., amount in scholarship money, distance from home, campus life, residences, programs, cost, prestige, etc.)


b) What is better - going to a low-ranked university and getting a lot in scholarship money or going to a high-ranked university and getting little in scholarship money?


c) Should I consider staying in town for university? Will this help me save money for future goals (i.e., studying in the UK, graduate school/law school, etc.)?


d) I want to make a chart with all of the universities that Iím considering. What factors should be included in this chart?


e) How do I begin to narrow down universities and programs? There are a couple of programs that Iím interested - even at the same university. For instance, I like four different programs at the University of Windsor. I donít know. I donít really want to spend $1,000 applying to universities. Even aside from the monetary inefficiency, having a lot of acceptances will make my decision that much more difficult.
a) Look into everything. Figure out which factors are the most important to you (class size, prestige, distance from home, scholarships, etc.) and go from there.

b) That would depend on what is more important to you. Do you care about going to the school of your dreams, but having to take out loans to pay for it? Or would you rather settle for some other school just because you have the scholarship? In my situation, I'm going to the school of my dreams - more than I could ever imagine a college offering, but I do have to pay for it, to the tune of about $33k per year. But it's worth it, because that's where I want to be. I didn't settle.

c) If you want to stay in town, and the university in your town has something to offer that you like (all the factors work for you), then go for it. But don't let money-saving be the reason you go to a school unless that's where you'll be happy.

d) Again, whatever factors are most important to you. My biggest ones were class size and distance from home, my class rankings and how I matched up with admissions, cost, and the quality education I would get specifically for my major.

e) You really need to figure out what's important to you when it comes to university. Figuring out which factors you really think are the most important for you - what do you want out of going to university, what kind of atmosphere do you want to learn in, etc?
As far as programs are concerned, figure out what you really like to do, and what direction you want to take your life. If you don't find the right program right away, you can always change it to figure out exactly what you want to do. Talk to someone from admissions about the various programs you're looking into, and ask an advisor about what they would suggest for you and why. No harm in asking!

Hope this helps,
~Emily


ďDon't get too comfortable with who you are at any given time. You may miss the opportunity to become who you want to be." ~Jon Bon Jovi

   
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