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Depression and Suicide If you or a loved one is feeling depressed or suicidal, you are not alone. Talk with other users about your feelings here.

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  (#1 (permalink)) Old
SouthernBelle. Offline
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Mental Health/Depression Medication? - March 28th 2011, 09:38 PM

Now, I don't know if I'm the only one who thinks this way, but I'm pretty sure I'm the only one here that thinks this way.

I personally believe that medicine for mental problems is not required. Now, I know that's gonna get me a bunch of people popping up and saying: "I couldn't live without my medicine!" Please, say what you will, but this is what I'm saying.

I don't think being so dependant on a drug is right. Has anyone ever watched that old Hulk movie where the doctor keeps telling and persisting to tell the girl that she can't walk, she can't walk, and that her medicine will help her get better and be able to walk again? If you have watched it, then you would have seen that when the girl realized that all of it was just in her head, she could walk. And I know it's fiction, but there are many real life stories like that, if you google them.

I personally think that psychologists need to concentrate more on doing what they're supposed to be doing, and counselling and giving advice to the people in need of it, rather than saying: "Oh, you have such-and-such, let's just give you some such-and-such and we'll let you go on."

Did you know that antidepressants mess with the serotonin in your brain, and can actually cause some of the things they're supposed to be fixing, or make them ten times worse, or even create an entirely new problem that you have to fix with even more medicine? Did you know that many serial killers were on antidepressants when they began killing? Did you know that after being on your medicine for a long period of time, your body becomes immune to it, and it no longer works, and you're back in the same boat you were in before?

Besides this, just because a doctor goes to school and gets a degree doesn't mean they know everything. Think back to your least favorite teacher, the one who was boring and couldn't answer a question correctly about their subject when you asked them about it and they didn't have access to books or a computer. Now ask yourself: Is your doctor any different?

Just because the FDA approves a medicine doesn't mean it'll work and it won't make you even worse off. Look at how many 'medicines' have been recalled in the last five years, and you'll catch my drift.

My theory is that all illnesses can be overcome with great effort on the patient's part, and some deep mind-searching to figure out what's causing your depression and efforts to fix it, no matter what happens. The short-term solution is just a short-term fix; the long-term solution will stick forever.

This is coming from a formerly depressed, suicidal person who talked to the people in her head and thought there was something coming to get her every time it got dark or the sun was going to fall on her head during the day, too. I went to my doctor, yes, but I never touched a pill bottle, and I got through it well on my own, and became a stronger and more outspoken person because of what I'd been through. I'm thoroughly convinced that if I'd taken the medicine my doctor had thought about prescribing me, I would have been worse off.

Thoughts? This is just a debate, by the way, so please no furious replies, or even annoyed ones, it's just something that has been on my mind for a while that I'd like to get some different opinions on.


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1. Do what you want within the bounds of reason, whenever you want to, and regret nothing. 2. If you have an opinion, don't beat around the bush, or there isn't a point in saying it. 3. Don't keep the company of anyone who won't like you and will try to change you.



   
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Re: Mental Health/Depression Medication? - March 28th 2011, 09:51 PM

Honestly, you've got to consider the root of the person's problem before saying whether medication works or not.

Some people are depressed because of things in life, traumatic incidents, puberty, and various other things. Those would be easier to solve with therapy instead of medication, I'd agree.

However, there are people who have Depression because of nothing more than a chemical imbalance in their minds. When you think about it, if somebody is depressed because of chemicals, NOT because of their feelings, emotions, life, etc., then therapy would probably be nothing more than helping them cope with feeling down. And well, coping isn't solving the problem. Chemical imbalances are like a disease, that needs medication.

Lets put it this way. Would you make somebody who had a physical illness, even something as simple as Acid Reflux, not take their medications because "they don't work"? No, right? Because it works for their physical ailment. And a chemical imbalance in the brain isn't really much different.


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Re: Mental Health/Depression Medication? - March 29th 2011, 01:35 AM

Quote:
I personally believe that medicine for mental problems is not required. Now, I know that's gonna get me a bunch of people popping up and saying: "I couldn't live without my medicine!" Please, say what you will, but this is what I'm saying.
Umm... No, it's not always required. I agree with that. Hell, you are an example because you got over a lot of stuff on your own. However, there are a LOT of causes of depression (and every other mental illness), so every case is going to be different. And because every case is different, it IS required sometimes. That doesn't necessarily mean that they will have to take it the rest of their LIVES or anything, but sometimes it is required just to stabilize the chemicals in people's bodies.

Quote:
I don't think being so dependant on a drug is right. Has anyone ever watched that old Hulk movie where the doctor keeps telling and persisting to tell the girl that she can't walk, she can't walk, and that her medicine will help her get better and be able to walk again? If you have watched it, then you would have seen that when the girl realized that all of it was just in her head, she could walk. And I know it's fiction, but there are many real life stories like that, if you google them.
Well, sometimes people actually DO need a drug to function. I agree that sometimes psychiatrists give drugs a bit too soon, but that doesn't mean that the drugs are completely unnecessary for everyone.

Quote:
I personally think that psychologists need to concentrate more on doing what they're supposed to be doing, and counselling and giving advice to the people in need of it, rather than saying: "Oh, you have such-and-such, let's just give you some such-and-such and we'll let you go on."
I thought psychologists couldn't prescribe meds?
Well, I think that therapy should be tried FIRST and it should be the main part of treatment (depending on the person--I guess if they didn't WANT therapy they shouldn't be forced to get it), but I don't think they should totally ban the medicine or anything. As far as depression goes, the most effective thing is a combination of the two. That's not to say that ALL people need both (or even one) of these to get over depression, it's just saying that the combination is the most efficient for a large group of people. Does that make sense?

Quote:
Did you know that antidepressants mess with the serotonin in your brain, and can actually cause some of the things they're supposed to be fixing, or make them ten times worse, or even create an entirely new problem that you have to fix with even more medicine? Did you know that many serial killers were on antidepressants when they began killing? Did you know that after being on your medicine for a long period of time, your body becomes immune to it, and it no longer works, and you're back in the same boat you were in before?
Yeah, it DOES mess with chemicals, but generally if this is controlled well there isn't a huge problem. I'm not denying the possibility of a problem coming up with it, but still... it doesn't happen most of the time.
Sorry, but the serial killer thing is just stupid. That's like saying having a mustache is going to make you try to take over the world and start killing Jews because that's what Hitler did. And he had a mustache.
And as for the body becoming immune to it: I can't really comment on this as I don't know enough about dosage or anything, but I will say that many people don't USE the medicine long-term so this doesn't really matter for their case.

Quote:
Besides this, just because a doctor goes to school and gets a degree doesn't mean they know everything. Think back to your least favorite teacher, the one who was boring and couldn't answer a question correctly about their subject when you asked them about it and they didn't have access to books or a computer. Now ask yourself: Is your doctor any different?
... Doctors are people too. They make mistakes, just like everyone else. However, they all have really good education and most of them are not corrupt and they're not bad. They DO want to help people. Again, this doesn't apply to EVERY doctor, but it does apply to a large number of them. And I'm not understanding that metaphor. I've met doctors and teachers that didn't know what the fuck they were talking about, yes, but... How does that prove anything? Most doctors can tell you what's wrong.

Quote:
Just because the FDA approves a medicine doesn't mean it'll work and it won't make you even worse off. Look at how many 'medicines' have been recalled in the last five years, and you'll catch my drift.
This is true... However, medicine isn't really as simple as many people think it is. It's not like they just KNOW what combination of chemicals is going to work. There isn't really a mathematical formula that gives you combinations of chemicals to try... Mostly this stuff is just trial-and-error. They test it before they approve and release it, but sadly, sometimes the "true" effects aren't shown until the general public finds that it is making THEM worse.

Quote:
My theory is that all illnesses can be overcome with great effort on the patient's part, and some deep mind-searching to figure out what's causing your depression and efforts to fix it, no matter what happens. The short-term solution is just a short-term fix; the long-term solution will stick forever.
Your theory is... probably not correct. Sometimes people try as hard as they can to get over things and to understand things, but it just doesn't work. Sometimes drugs have to be used in the short-term so that the therapy will help in the long-term.

Quote:
This is coming from a formerly depressed, suicidal person who talked to the people in her head and thought there was something coming to get her every time it got dark or the sun was going to fall on her head during the day, too. I went to my doctor, yes, but I never touched a pill bottle, and I got through it well on my own, and became a stronger and more outspoken person because of what I'd been through. I'm thoroughly convinced that if I'd taken the medicine my doctor had thought about prescribing me, I would have been worse off.
I'm happy you were able to get over all of that by yourself. That's pretty fucking remarkable. But just because you did it doesn't mean everyone can, you know?



   
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Re: Mental Health/Depression Medication? - March 29th 2011, 02:31 AM

Well I have been on many different medicines over the past ten years. I have to keep switching. So i kinda have to agree with you. Cause honestly i haven't really felt different with the meds. so thats why they keep changing my meds. but some meds do help too. so its hard to agree or disagree. It goes either way for different people.
   
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Re: Mental Health/Depression Medication? - April 2nd 2011, 06:55 PM

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Originally Posted by Thirteen View Post
Some people are depressed because of things in life, traumatic incidents, puberty, and various other things. Those would be easier to solve with therapy instead of medication, I'd agree.

However, there are people who have Depression because of nothing more than a chemical imbalance in their minds. When you think about it, if somebody is depressed because of chemicals, NOT because of their feelings, emotions, life, etc., then therapy would probably be nothing more than helping them cope with feeling down. And well, coping isn't solving the problem. Chemical imbalances are like a disease, that needs medication.
I agree with this completely. If you had a broken leg you'd see a doctor, wouldn't you? When you think about it, depression you can't necessarily see. A broken leg is something physical; you can see it. Both depression and a broken leg cause pain. Now why wouldn't you see a doctor for depression? Obviously this is just an example, but a chemical imbalance won't get better alone, like a broken leg wouldn't heal properly without a cast.
   
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