TeenHelp
Support Forums Today's Posts

Get Advice Connect with TeenHelp Resources
HelpLINK Facebook     Twitter     Tumblr     Instagram    Hotlines    Safety Zone    Alternatives


You are not registered or have not logged in

Hello guest! (Not a guest? Log in above!)

As a guest on TeenHelp you are only able to use some of our site's features. By registering an account you will be able to enjoy unlimited access to our site, and will be able to:

  • Connect with thousands of teenagers worldwide by actively taking part in our Support Forums and Chat Room.
  • Find others with similar interests in our Social Groups.
  • Express yourself through our Blogs, Picture Albums and User Profiles.
  • And much much more!

Signing up is free, anonymous and will only take a few moments, so click here to register now!


Disabilities Living with a disability, either physical or mental, can be both challenging and life changing. For support, questions and discussions relating to disabilities, post here.

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  (#1 (permalink)) Old
kristina.d.97 Offline
Member
Welcome me, I'm new!
*
 
kristina.d.97's Avatar
 
Age: 22

Posts: 2
Join Date: April 28th 2015

Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 28th 2015, 04:21 PM

I'm Kristina and I have a twin sister with autism. She is pretty severe on the spectrum as she depends on my family for everything-like getting dressed, using the bathroom, eating, and stuff. It's been a challenging road. I was hoping that by creating this bulletin that I would meet other teens with similar challenges. You are all strong
   
  (#2 (permalink)) Old
Skyline Offline
Member
Experienced TeenHelper
******
 
Skyline's Avatar
 
Name: Skye
Age: 19
Gender: Female
Location: France

Posts: 512
Blog Entries: 3
Join Date: August 24th 2014

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 28th 2015, 04:31 PM

Hi there and welcome to teenhelp I can't really relate to you on that point... I'm not close to anyone diagnosed with autism... but I can help with any other questions ^^


"You shall love your crooked neighbour / with your crooked heart."
   
  (#3 (permalink)) Old
Astrophile. Offline
Member
I've been here a while
********
 
Astrophile.'s Avatar
 
Name: Brittany
Age: 25
Gender: Female

Posts: 1,113
Blog Entries: 110
Join Date: November 5th 2012

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 28th 2015, 11:04 PM

Hi there,

I have a younger sister who has Autism and intellectual disabilities. I have got to say, it's really hard to live with someone who's so "different," but over the years I have become used to it and I love her to death. I would do anything for her. She's not very severe according to the spectrum, as she is able to be independent and she is getting prepared to graduate from high school in June. She also has very little problem communicating with people she is close to. If it's someone she's not used to, forget about it! I can see her little quirks, and I love every one of them.

Does your sister have something she's really good at? I heard that people with Autism generally have a talent or two that they really love to do. My sister is really good at using the computer. She loves to read and write, even though she's 19 and at a 1st/2nd grade level. It just doesn't stop her from living her life, and I adore that about her. She never gives up and I am inspired by that.

I hope you're well. PM me anytime.


There is no beauty without some strangeness.
-EAP-

   
  (#4 (permalink)) Old
_Headphones_ Offline
Music Lover

Outside, huh?
**********
 
_Headphones_'s Avatar
 
Name: Frankie<3
Age: 27
Gender: Female
Location: Hiding from the heffalumps

Posts: 4,327
Blog Entries: 28
Join Date: January 7th 2009

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 28th 2015, 11:28 PM

I have a sister who is diagnosed Mentally retarded. It is really hard because she has a brain of a 12 year old. She is stuck at the stage of I want it now and I'll throw a fit if I don't get it now. She can't read or write but she can recognize shop signs and fast food signs. Like she knows the taco bell sign and stuff. My sister is in special Olympics she does Bowling, bocce ball, and swimming. She can talk but sometimes you can't understand her most of the time I can understand her though.

I think it's wrong for the society to have like autism awareness month and downsydrom awareness month and nothing for the mentally retarded people. Because there is a lot of them out there and they don't get the support like the two other ones I mentioned.


Plus I have disabilities of my own. I have a lot of learning disabilities. Mental disabilities, and stuff like that


Don't lose who you are, in the blur of the stars
Seeing is deceiving, dreaming is believing,
It's okay not to be okay
Sometimes it's hard, to follow your heart
Tears don't mean you're losing, everybody's bruising,
Just be true to who you are
|Member 2007||Senior Community Mentor||Social Media Guru||Resource & Newsletter Editor||Writer||Chat Mod|
|Forum Mod: LGBT, Sexuality and gender identity, Eating Disorders, Self-Harm, Peer Pressure and Bullying, Disability|
|PM/VM|


   
  (#5 (permalink)) Old
cynefin Offline
Verbal venom.

TeenHelp Addict
************
 
cynefin's Avatar
 
Age: 20
Gender: Female
Location: 1261'

Posts: 9,794
Blog Entries: 1483
Join Date: August 25th 2012

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 29th 2015, 02:08 AM

I have a twin brother who is severely autistic, he was diagnosed when we were toddlers. He used to sign, and he sometimes talks when he wants something but he can't hold a conversation. He's gone missing before, and he gets dangerously violent during his outbursts but when he's happy he's amazing to be around. Even though he can't communicate well, he has such a great sense of humor in his own little way and I love him just the way he is. I've been told I'm like a second mother to him and I believe we have a special twin bond. Like Britt said, a lot of people with autism tend to have something they do really well! My brother enjoys listening to music in different languages, and he's good at researching things online. You can make a social group for this if you're interested!

Quote:
I think it's wrong for the society to have like autism awareness month and downsydrom awareness month and nothing for the mentally retarded people. Because there is a lot of them out there and they don't get the support like the two other ones I mentioned.
March is national Mental Retardation month, or Developmental/Intellectual Disabilities month. It's more commonly known as the Developmental/Intellectual Disabilities month because some people take offense to the word retardation as it is sometimes used as an insult. I'm sure there are support groups and fundraisers for awareness for developmental disabilities, just like there are for autism and down's syndrome. But there is a month for mental retardation, and you should do some research and check things out!


Articles & Resources Officer|Lead Moderator|Senior Newsletter Editor
The mountains are calling and I must go.
1941-2016

Nature does not rush, yet everything is accomplished
-Lao Tzu
Memories made in the mountains stay in our hearts forever
Move the body, quiet the mind
   
  (#6 (permalink)) Old
_Headphones_ Offline
Music Lover

Outside, huh?
**********
 
_Headphones_'s Avatar
 
Name: Frankie<3
Age: 27
Gender: Female
Location: Hiding from the heffalumps

Posts: 4,327
Blog Entries: 28
Join Date: January 7th 2009

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 29th 2015, 02:18 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassiopeia. View Post


March is national Mental Retardation month, or Developmental/Intellectual Disabilities month. It's more commonly known as the Developmental/Intellectual Disabilities month because some people take offense to the word retardation as it is sometimes used as an insult. I'm sure there are support groups and fundraisers for awareness for developmental disabilities, just like there are for autism and down's syndrome. But there is a month for mental retardation, and you should do some research and check things out!
Thank you Cassie I was not aware of this.[/color]


Don't lose who you are, in the blur of the stars
Seeing is deceiving, dreaming is believing,
It's okay not to be okay
Sometimes it's hard, to follow your heart
Tears don't mean you're losing, everybody's bruising,
Just be true to who you are
|Member 2007||Senior Community Mentor||Social Media Guru||Resource & Newsletter Editor||Writer||Chat Mod|
|Forum Mod: LGBT, Sexuality and gender identity, Eating Disorders, Self-Harm, Peer Pressure and Bullying, Disability|
|PM/VM|


   
  (#7 (permalink)) Old
Bluetears Offline
Blue
Junior TeenHelper
****
 
Bluetears's Avatar
 
Name: Crystal
Gender: Questioning
Location: The corner of sadness and yet love

Posts: 232
Join Date: March 19th 2015

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 29th 2015, 05:15 AM

Hey

My brother, his name is Seth, also has autism. He has a rare type called Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. He got it when he was about 2 through his MMR vaccine I believe. Seth got very sick days after he received the vaccine. He had a high temperature and was vomiting. So, my parents took him to the ER and they checked him out. They decided to give him some Tylonal (I believe it's spelled like that). So, they went and got this give syringe filled to the brim with this stuff (it wasn't a needle). Before I go any farther, let me say this. Seth could speak, was potty-trained, could walk, feed himself to an extent, etc. He also did not like taking medicine. They had to bring in 4 nurses to pin him down so he could take the medicine. He either regurgitated it or inhaled it. The doctors didn't know how much he actually swallowed, so they brought in another dose, once again filled to the brim, and shot that down his throat. He once again regurgitated or inhaled a lot of it. They took him temperature and realized it lowered a bit and sent them home. Days later, he lost everything. He couldn't remember how to walk, talk, feed himself, all the things he used to know was gone. He was a baby again.


His mind essentially works like this. When it comes to memories, to us it's like a movie; we can recall almost everything and name of people and places. To him, however, it's like looking through someone else's scrapbook. He can see what is happening in little sections, but he wouldn't be able to name of the people and places there unless it is enforced.


When it comes to learning things for him, this happened a lot especially when everything started, it needs to be enforced, otherwise he will lose it. You can look at it sort of like a balloon. You blow it up with knowledge, but if you don't tie it and tie it down, it'll deflate and fly away.


One thing I've noticed with autistic people, is when they feel an emotion, they feel it to the max. If they are happy, they are really, really happy. Everyone around them in that mood can't help but smile at least a little. When they are upset and angry, they are about as ticked off as they possibly can. It's a little bit different for each of them, but I've noticed that happen with every person I've interacted with that has autism.


Seth has recently been having hallucinations that come with his autism. He's currently 13, almost 14. He'll see figures walk past his door in the night, and one time he said he saw a giant black bunny with glowing white eyes run past outside. Another thing we've had to deal with is meltdowns. Their minds basically whenever they get overstimulated, their brains will basically shut down to stop the senses and calm itself down. It's quite literally a meltdown, hehe. It's like a reset switch in the brain.


It's been a challenge for sure, but it's only made our love for Seth stronger. He's just a big sweetheart when he's in a good mood. It's truly amazing.


"Remember your loved and you always will be. This melody will bring you right back home." - Linkin park, The messenger. Stay strong everyone!! You are always strong enough to get through whatever life throws your way, no matter how hard it may seem.
   
  (#8 (permalink)) Old
DeletedAccount19
Guest
 
DeletedAccount19's Avatar
Edit avatar
 

Posts: n/a

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 29th 2015, 01:04 PM

I have self-diagnosed myself as being an Aspie, which I know I shouldn't do. I have done research on Asperger's and I can relate to a lot of what adults with Asperger's experience/do/feel/etc. I have brought it up to my counselor, and she keeps mentioning she will bring it up to my psychiatrist. But I don't know why. If anyone knows how to properly be diagnosed with Asperger's, please let me know.

Anyways, I definitely have some learning disabilities. For me, it's hard sometimes, because I can't get the words I want to say out and I don't have the appropriate filters. I speak before I think my thought through, and sometimes it's something better left unsaid. I also have ADD and ADHD, which was hard to handle when I was still in school. I couldn't focus on the class or get my homework done in a timely manner. I had to take two extra years in high school, graduating in 2005 instead of 2003.
   
  (#9 (permalink)) Old
random.swirls Offline
Member
Average Joe
***
 
random.swirls's Avatar
 
Name: Meera
Age: 21
Gender: Female
Location: Hogwarts

Posts: 172
Join Date: September 2nd 2012

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 29th 2015, 07:10 PM

Hello,

I myself have aspergers/ high functioning autism , speech and langue delay , a slight lisp, CFS/ME (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) and intellectual disability.

Xx


Be Strong, Have Faith, Have Courage xx

Current Mental Health - Sever depression, SAD,Self harm, Suicide thoughts, anxiety attacks and voices in my head.

Current Medicines - Fluoxetine

Feel free to PM me anytime , I love getting PM's and I love supporting people as it distracts me from my horrible thoughts.
   
  (#10 (permalink)) Old
Not_here Offline
Member
I can't get enough
*********
 
Not_here's Avatar
 
Name: nobody
Gender: Other

Posts: 2,538
Blog Entries: 571
Join Date: October 24th 2011

Re: Siblings of Special Needs Kids - April 29th 2015, 11:42 PM

A few of my cousins have learning disabilities and were noticed by the school and they pressed to take them to professionals but parents keep it a secret and are in more denial than anything. Even to a point where they deny their children any form of assistance like switching schools, programs, making accommodations etc. But what's interesting is that mental health problems are more common in my family so I often wonder if just like special needs children is a population that tends to be more at risk for mental health problems, if it goes the other way around, that mental health problems is a sign or indicator to investigate further for a learning disability that was undiagnosed. Because they're so interconnected and living as an adult is probably hard if everyone assumes you're "normal". From stories I've heard, my grandpa would physically abuse (they call it punishment but he certainly went overboard with so called discipline) his children and some of my aunts and uncles got beaten more than others. Those same kids were the ones who "never listened" "hoarsed around" etc and were always messing up etc. There were 9 children and most of them learned by a certain age what would give them a beating and what wouldn't/how to avoid one and all that stuff (not that some of them weren't defiant on purpose but they strategically planned it out if they did) but this one uncle would keep getting hit. Later my uncle who was the most beaten up and considered the most trouble maker at home, went on heroine and other drugs as a teenager and is now much older and a high school dropout. I wonder if the older generations just don't call these things ADHD or Asperger's and just beats the child up until they "get it" but they never do. Maybe the high functioning ones get by okay because they adjust and learn how to not get spanked, but maybe they don't. Like my uncle is verbal and can pass as non-disabled. You know? But if you observe him you'll think twice. Most of my family have some kind of mental health battle too, even if not officially diagnosed, because they avoid and distrust mental health treatment anyway. It's just not in their cultural background to seek that.

Well all that being said. I've thought that my oldest sister might have had something, of course I'm not an expert so I don't know. But she did poorly in school and I have a whole bunch of reasons to think this. Though it could be trauma related and not learning disability in the common understanding. I don't think I have special needs but when I was a child I did. It was more of a temporary thing I guess. Special needs as more of an individual attention from the teacher and extra help because I had my own way of learning and was not adjusted to the way school worked as I haven't gone to school till age 6.

Last edited by Not_here; April 29th 2015 at 11:58 PM.
   
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Tags
kids, siblings, special

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All material copyright 1998-2018, TeenHelp.
Terms | Legal | Privacy | Conduct | Complaints

Powered by vBulletin®.
Copyright ©2000-2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search engine optimization by vBSEO.
Theme developed in association with vBStyles.