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Mental Health Use this forum to share your mental health concerns and to seek advice.

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Questions a web search couldn't answer :) - August 8th 2012, 11:45 PM

Okay, so, recently my diagnosis was changed.
To Mood disorder due to a general medical condition and Borderline Personality Disorder. I disagree with the BPD diagnosis but that's not what this thread is about.

Anywho, I'm not sure what medical conditions cause mood disorders, and I'm curious. I know I had a head injury as a child, and all myself and my family have managed to come up with was, maybe it's the head injury. But then, on a disability certificate, my doc ticked the box for "other nervous system disorder". Would a head injury count as a nervous system disorder? Does anybody know of any nervous system disorders that specifically result in mood disorders?

When I googled and wiki'd this, all that came up was things like Huntington's or Parkinson's, things you'd know for sure if you had.

So, if anybody knows anything more about this, could you please post?
Thanks. =]
   
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Re: Questions a web search couldn't answer :) - August 8th 2012, 11:51 PM

Yes, a head injury would count as a nervous system disorder. Your brain is the main part of your nervous system, as that is where a large part of your neurons are found

As for what "nervous system" disorders can cause symptoms similar to that of a mood disorder...the only thing I can think of is thyroid disease, but I'm not sure if that would be considered a nervous system disorder or a hormonal disorder. Either way, a lot of the symptoms of some thyroid problems are pretty similar to those of bipolar disorder, and it's easily diagnosed through a blood test.
I'll do some googling myself and see if I can find anything else for you.


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Re: Questions a web search couldn't answer :) - August 9th 2012, 12:08 AM

I'm taking a shot in the dark here, but maybe the mood disorder and the general medical condition aren't directly related? Like they think you're depressed because you have some major physical condition that isn't neurological. For example, if someone has chronic pain and depression or cancer and depression they might say that the depression is due to the other medical condition, but it isn't directly related. If that even makes sense. I have no idea if that's right or not, but that's what I'm thinking it might mean.


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Re: Questions a web search couldn't answer :) - August 9th 2012, 04:50 AM

Oh, I read up on the difference in notation, and mood disorder due to a general medical condition is different to say, being depressed because you have cancer. So what was on the medical certificate implies that the mood disorder is a direct result of another medical condition.

I'm starting to be fairly sure that it's from the head injury I had. I was told I present with a complex mix of orbital-frontal lobe damage, and some other stuff I forget because I've misplaced the summary.

And now I'm wondering if it's common for people who have sustained traumatic brain injuries to have trouble with their mental health.
   
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Re: Questions a web search couldn't answer :) - August 10th 2012, 10:25 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by i_like_black View Post
Oh, I read up on the difference in notation, and mood disorder due to a general medical condition is different to say, being depressed because you have cancer. So what was on the medical certificate implies that the mood disorder is a direct result of another medical condition.


There are two categories or types of medical conditions that result in a mood disorder. First, the emotional impact of knowing you have a medical condition, such as cancer. Second, emotional symptoms as a direct symptom of a medical condition. The latter can be a bit trickier to properly evaluate as there are literally hundreds to thousands of medical conditions that can involve neurological or behavioural symptoms. In some people, these symptoms may present as depression, whereas in others it can present as something completely different. Many of these syndromes tend to present themselves in early childhood or are inherited, so you can rule them out for yourself. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome, Cushing's Syndrome (i.e. can cause hypercalcemia which certainly affects behaviour and thinking), De Morsier's Syndrome (you'd know if you had this), Empty Sella Syndrome (a CT and MRI would easily rule this out), Gaucher's Syndrome (likely would involve other noticeable neurological symptoms), Kinsbourne Syndrome, Krabbe Syndrome (inherited and commonly involves other symptoms you don't have), Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (tends to present in childhood accompanied by movement disorders), Late-Onset Tay-Sachs disease, Sjorgen's Syndrome, William's Syndrome (highly unlikely) and Wilson's disease (hard to rule out without further info).

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Originally Posted by i_like_black View Post
I'm starting to be fairly sure that it's from the head injury I had. I was told I present with a complex mix of orbital-frontal lobe damage, and some other stuff I forget because I've misplaced the summary.


Damage to the OFC can result in a wide variety of symptoms, but generally the symptoms would be seen soon after the injury.

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And now I'm wondering if it's common for people who have sustained traumatic brain injuries to have trouble with their mental health.
That's a million dollar question. For OFC, there is tremendous variability regarding what areas people struggle in, the degree to which they struggle and whether their TBI resulted in an improvement in a certain area. Even though they may struggle, it need not affect them all that much, whereas other people are affected to a greater extent.


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Re: Questions a web search couldn't answer :) - August 11th 2012, 05:45 AM

Thanks OMFG . . . I don't know your name, sorry.

According to my mother, there was a drastic change in how I present about 3 - 4 months after the injury - so just as I was recovering and getting back to normal. (I was 10 turning 11, had about 6 - 9 months off school, I don't really remember). And I first starting experiencing extreme moods - depression manifesting as anger and homicidal urges - when I was 12, so just over a year after the injury.

I've had both a CT and an MRI late last year, so I don't have any of the things that would be ruled out by them - or I assume that if I did, I would have been told.

I also had a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment done near the end of last year, and what the neuropsych told me was that although some of my results could be impaired from estimated pre-morbid functioning, nothing actually scored below the "average" range - but that there had been clinically observed difficulties with planning, problem solving, emotion regulation, and impulsivity.

So that's what I know about the brain injury, yada yada, oh and the damage is still very evident from the MRI and they said that my level of functioning is surprising based on the extent of the damage - they expected either less damage or lower functioning. But you'd know all about that kind of thing anyway.

From what my doctor has said, I experience the second of what you said - emotional symptoms as a direct result of a medical condition. I just don't know what that medical condition is - all I know is the disability certificate says "other nervous system disorder".

And I've never heard of most of the diseases you've mentioned so I'm going to go and educate myself.

Tyvm for your reply.
   
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Re: Questions a web search couldn't answer :) - August 11th 2012, 10:22 PM

"Other nervous system disorder" is a catch-all category that translates to symptoms don't fit in any diagnostic syndrome but there still is something clinically significant. TBI would fall under this category. Depending what your doctor has written in their report, they may have investigated what caused the TBI (i.e. if you fainted and hit your head, then they may examine what caused the fainting). The neuropsychological results are typical of what you'd see from OFC damage, however, you need to keep your age in mind. A 12 year old is going to typically have some issues with emotional regulation and impulsivity, so the question becomes whether yours was/is beyond that average. Fortunately, the results revealed they're not.


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