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Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 02:41 AM

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Pediatricians Tackle Bullying - CBS News
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One group of doctors is taking on bullying. They're coming out with some ideas on ways to halt the violence that 8 percent of kids say happens to them every day; another 7 percent say it happens every week. CBS News correspondent Kelly Wallace reports that YouTube generation did not invent bullying, but has made it more visible. Thousands of no holds barred videos are posted online. It appears the violence in them is getting worse. Thirteen-year-old eighth grader Daniel Warburton can relate. He's been relentlessly bullied since the fourth grade. At first, it was name-calling. He was called, "names like faggot, gay," Daniel said, "they would use very vile words." Then last year, on the football field, it got physical. Daniel was repeatedly tackled to the point of unconsciousness by seven of his own teammates. Daniel's mother, Jennifer Warburton says, "They just left him there. He was so afraid to say anything, that by the time the coaches got down to the field for practice, he just got up and went through the whole practice." He told Kelly Wallace that when it comes to bullying, people don't really get it. "They think it's just something that happens, oh it just happens, and brush it off." Like Daniel, almost 6 million kids, nearly 30% of all children, are either bullied or are doing the bullying. Reporter's Notebook: High Rate Of Bullying Alarming Now - for the first time - the American Academy of Pediatrics is including a section on bullying in its new recommendations for pediatricians. Those recommendations include: encouraging counseling for children and their families, treating violence related problems and, increasing parents, administrators and teachers' awareness of bullying. "The biggest misconception in this country is that bullying is normative behavior. That this is just kids being kids and that it really is no big deal," says Dr. Joseph Wright, the lead author of the American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement. Dr. Wright cites a study which found that in two-thirds of school shootings - from Columbine to West Paducah, Kentucky - the shooters had been repeatedly bullied. Another study found 60 percent of bullies in grades 6 through 9 had at least one criminal conviction by age 24. At the same time, the American Academy of Pediatrics says doctors, parents and teachers shouldn't just focus on the bully and the bullied. They should target the bystanders who witness the bullying. Teachers are doing that at Walter S. Boardman Elementary School in Long Island, New York. Students are learning how to stand up to bullies. Sixth-grader Gabriella Gaitan says, "I saw somebody being bullied on the playground. I told the bully how she felt and how I felt and the bully stopped bullying her." Daniel Warburton made a video about his bullying experience which is now on YouTube. He says that he "wanted to change something, tell people that's not right, you shouldn't do that." Daniel's therapy is music. He plays the tuba. It's helped him realize what the pediatrics academy hopes others will get - that he's not the troubled one - the bully is.
interesting information.


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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 03:42 AM

I'm glad someone's taking more of a notice.
My sister was being bullied before school ended. And the teacher said she'd "Keep an eye on it" and that's the best she could do.



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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 03:54 AM

One problem, at least in schools, is that there is 1 teacher for 20-30+ students. For the entire school, the students easily outnumber the teachers, so the teachers have to divide their attention amongst the amount of kids. Then add the fact that the kids are not all in one area, they can be all over the school.

It would be better if by-standing students stepped in, although many don't. You'd have to give them the courage to stand up to the bully and then report it. Some kids will do that but not a lot.

Will a bully stop bullying if a bystander confronts the bully? Perhaps, although that does not necessarily mean that the bully won't continue bullying later on when the bystander is away.

Targetting the bystanders is not a new, revolutionary idea. It's a relatively old one, one which has not been effective overall. I'm curious as to how they plan to get the bystanders to come forth.
   
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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 03:58 AM

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One problem, at least in schools, is that there is 1 teacher for 20-30+ students. For the entire school, the students easily outnumber the teachers, so the teachers have to divide their attention amongst the amount of kids. Then add the fact that the kids are not all in one area, they can be all over the school.

It would be better if by-standing students stepped in, although many don't. You'd have to give them the courage to stand up to the bully and then report it. Some kids will do that but not a lot.

Will a bully stop bullying if a bystander confronts the bully? Perhaps, although that does not necessarily mean that the bully won't continue bullying later on when the bystander is away.

Targetting the bystanders is not a new, revolutionary idea. It's a relatively old one, one which has not been effective overall. I'm curious as to how they plan to get the bystanders to come forth.
One thing I hated as a kid was being told that people are getting bullied because of me not standing up for them though. Where I too was getting bullied, and I didn't want to put myself even more so in the line of fire.

While there is a huge teacher to student ratio, at least in the case of me, my brother, and sister (We have some like "Everyone bully me please" gene or something. xD Or we're all major nerds. Either one.) teachers don't pay attention much to my brother and sister because they're the good kids playing nice on the playground. And anyone playing with them probably is too playing nice.

So like, at least equal attention for each student? And if you can't get close to that, you need to look into getting more help for your classroom.



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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 05:57 AM

This is good, while i'm not sure how much it will help, it definitely won't hurt.
I never got physically beaten up in school, but i was constantly excluded from groups. people groaned when i was put on their team, etc. A best friend of mine, however, was beaten up, and at one point in middle school she was locked in a closet by a whole group of kids after school before a performance and no one found her for TWO HOURS, she's now majorly claustraphobic.
I think maybe the best way to take care of bullying would be to make bullies understand that they are actually really hurting kids, that is not just a little fun, that it really causes damage.



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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 07:56 AM

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While there is a huge teacher to student ratio, at least in the case of me, my brother, and sister (We have some like "Everyone bully me please" gene or something. xD Or we're all major nerds. Either one.) teachers don't pay attention much to my brother and sister because they're the good kids playing nice on the playground. And anyone playing with them probably is too playing nice.

So like, at least equal attention for each student? And if you can't get close to that, you need to look into getting more help for your classroom.
The issue is, most teachers I've encountered would put more attention to the trouble-makers, not the little angels and the in between ones. Promoting equal attention is hard enough as it is because once a few kids start up a mess, then the teacher has to sort that one out and make sure the rest don't go wild, which results in inequal attention.

Equal attention would work if there were less students per teacher or more teachers in one room (could either be amazing or just a big circle jerk).

So, I'd say equal attention when there is no mess going on, which is something teachers should be doing anyways. When there is a mess, then equal attention doesn't exactly work very well.

An alternate would be to see which kids are causing more of a mess and put them in a separate class with others who cause a mess. Now, it's no longer a simple bully-and-victim class but rather bully-and-bully class. It's likely that one or more of the bullies will become victims but for that class, I'd say put in a ball-busting teacher who is strict, teaches the class the same material as the non-mess-making group. Of course, the problem here is that it doesn't prevent bullying outside of class and you'd need to figure out a criteria for the bullies to meet, deal with the parents, politics, etc... .
   
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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 08:21 AM

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The issue is, most teachers I've encountered would put more attention to the trouble-makers, not the little angels and the in between ones. Promoting equal attention is hard enough as it is because once a few kids start up a mess, then the teacher has to sort that one out and make sure the rest don't go wild, which results in inequal attention.

Equal attention would work if there were less students per teacher or more teachers in one room (could either be amazing or just a big circle jerk).

So, I'd say equal attention when there is no mess going on, which is something teachers should be doing anyways. When there is a mess, then equal attention doesn't exactly work very well.

An alternate would be to see which kids are causing more of a mess and put them in a separate class with others who cause a mess. Now, it's no longer a simple bully-and-victim class but rather bully-and-bully class. It's likely that one or more of the bullies will become victims but for that class, I'd say put in a ball-busting teacher who is strict, teaches the class the same material as the non-mess-making group. Of course, the problem here is that it doesn't prevent bullying outside of class and you'd need to figure out a criteria for the bullies to meet, deal with the parents, politics, etc... .
Yeah that's fair enough.

I guess to me then it gets more onto the issue of finding a way to get a smaller student teacher ratio then. More teachers = more attention to kids.

But then you get a whole other bag of marbles.



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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 12:55 PM

I agree more teachers need to be added to the classroom....


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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 10:49 PM

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I agree more teachers need to be added to the classroom....
That could work, although then the school would have to pay approx. twice the amount of teachers. If the school can afford that, then that may be suitable. Both teachers though would have to be on the same page, which probably wouldn't be too difficult. I suppose one issue would be, which teacher teaches? Suppose it's a math class, then does one teacher sit at the back and supervise which another teaches, and if so, then do they take turns teaching? Or, do they teach at the same time?

Suppose it's a very subjective course, such as English, then the two teachers have to mark the same. It would be unfair for one to mark differently than another, so to resolve it, there ideally should be some objective sheet or marking scheme that they'd have to follow which would have to be very unambiguous.
   
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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 13th 2009, 11:11 PM

I don't like the idea of two teachers in a classroom, just less kids in a class, so you can watch a higher percentage of kids.
But unfortunately, there's no money in the school system to afford it.




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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 14th 2009, 04:38 PM

Are they ACTUALLY doing something? Most of the time schools say they're preventing bullying, but they do nothing. I had to switch schools because I got bullied so badly at a school that had a "zero-tolerance policy for bullying"(Exact quote...)

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That could work, although then the school would have to pay approx. twice the amount of teachers. If the school can afford that, then that may be suitable. Both teachers though would have to be on the same page, which probably wouldn't be too difficult. I suppose one issue would be, which teacher teaches? Suppose it's a math class, then does one teacher sit at the back and supervise which another teaches, and if so, then do they take turns teaching? Or, do they teach at the same time?

Suppose it's a very subjective course, such as English, then the two teachers have to mark the same. It would be unfair for one to mark differently than another, so to resolve it, there ideally should be some objective sheet or marking scheme that they'd have to follow which would have to be very unambiguous.
We could just have smaller classes. I think we should have smaller classes anyway because I always end up getting held back by the bloody idiots in my classes. Smaller classes would actually have lots of benefits, especially education-wise. But of course anything that might actually encourage the smart kids to succeed instead working at the pace of the slowest dumb-asses can't be good!


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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 15th 2009, 10:45 PM

It sounds like a good idea.
   
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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 17th 2009, 04:48 AM

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Are they ACTUALLY doing something? Most of the time schools say they're preventing bullying, but they do nothing. I had to switch schools because I got bullied so badly at a school that had a "zero-tolerance policy for bullying"(Exact quote...)
I don't know the actual numbers but I'd imagine millions of kids are bullied, some to worse degrees than others. Since the students easily outnumber the teachers and other staff (i.e. janitors, etc...), it doesn't seem too unreasonable that not every single case of bullying gets dealt with, does it?

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We could just have smaller classes. I think we should have smaller classes anyway because I always end up getting held back by the bloody idiots in my classes. Smaller classes would actually have lots of benefits, especially education-wise. But of course anything that might actually encourage the smart kids to succeed instead working at the pace of the slowest dumb-asses can't be good!
Why not just have a way of categorizing students into the "smart" classes and "dumb" classes. Make it optional if need be. You could also have it so that a "smart" class member can go to the "dumb" class and vice-versa.

Or, just have smaller classes with kids of a diverse range of intelligence.
   
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Re: Pediatricians Tackle Bullying. - June 17th 2009, 05:33 AM

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Why not just have a way of categorizing students into the "smart" classes and "dumb" classes. Make it optional if need be. You could also have it so that a "smart" class member can go to the "dumb" class and vice-versa.

Or, just have smaller classes with kids of a diverse range of intelligence.
We actually had the "smart" and "dumb" classes in middle school, and really.. it worked great in my opinion.



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