TeenHelp
Support Forums Today's Posts Chat Room


Get Advice Connect with TeenHelp Resources
HelpLINK Chat and Live Help Facebook     Twitter     Tumblr     Instagram    Safety Zone
   Hotlines
   Alternatives
   Calendar


You are not registered or have not logged in

Hello guest! (Not a guest? Log in above!)

As a guest on TeenHelp you are only able to use some of our site's features. By registering an account you will be able to enjoy unlimited access to our site, and will be able to:

  • Connect with thousands of teenagers worldwide by actively taking part in our Support Forums and Chat Room.
  • Find others with similar interests in our Social Groups.
  • Express yourself through our Blogs, Picture Albums and User Profiles.
  • And much much more!

Signing up is free, anonymous and will only take a few moments, so click here to register now!



Sex and Puberty For questions related to sex, puberty, birth control and sexual health, ask here!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread
  (#1 (permalink)) Old
eunoia Offline
(n) beautiful thinking
Jeez, get a life!
***********
 
eunoia's Avatar
 
Name: Jes
Gender: Female
Location: USA

Posts: 5,883
Points: 53,926, Level: 33 Points: 53,926, Level: 33 Points: 53,926, Level: 33
Level up: 36% Level up: 36% Level up: 36%
Blog Entries: 2
Join Date: January 5th 2009

Information on Sexually Transmitted Infections - January 14th 2009, 02:35 PM

Information on Sexually Transmitted Infections

In this guide you will find very basic information on what these STIs are, who gets them, how they are transferred, signs of infection, and treatment and prevention options. Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) and Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) are often used interchangeably. If you have or develop any of these symptoms you should make an appointment to see your GP/physician as soon as possible. For more information on STIs visit www.cdc.gov or another reputable website.

The following STIs/STDs are explained:
  • Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)
  • Chlamydia
  • Genital HPV Infection
  • Genital Herpes
  • Gonorrhea
  • HIV
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV)
  • Trichomoniasis
Bacterial Vaginosis
What is it? Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a condition in women where the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina is disrupted and replaced by an excess of certain bacteria.

Who gets it and how? BV is the most common vaginal infection in women of childbearing age. The cause of BV is unknown, although having a new or multiple sex partners and douching may upset the balance of bacteria, putting a woman at risk. Abstinence, limiting sex partners, refraining from douching, and completing BV medications can prevent bacterial vaginosis.

Signs and treatment:
BV is sometimes accompanied by discharge, odor, pain, itching, or burning. BV is treatable with antibiotics (metronidazole or clindamycin).
Chlamydia
What is it? Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis.

Who gets it and how?
Chlamydia is the most commonly reported bacterial STI in the US. Women are frequently re-infected when their partners are not treated. Chlamydia can be transmitted during vaginal, anal, or oral sex and can be prevented by abstaining, using condoms, and yearly testing.

Signs and treatment:
Symptoms of chlamydia are usually mild or absent, but can include discharge from the penis of an infected man. Serious complications, including infertility, can occur before a woman is even diagnosed. Chlamydia can be easily and effectively treated with a single dose of azithromycin or a week of doxycycline (twice daily). Both are antibiotics.
Genital HPV Infection
What is it? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus that infects the skin and mucous membranes. There are more than 40 HPV types. You cannot see HPV.

Who gets it and?
HPV is the most common STI. Men and women can get HPV. HPV is transmitted through genital contact (vaginal and anal sex) and can be prevented by abstaining, using condoms, and being vaccinated.

Signs and treatment:
Generally there are not signs, although an infected person may develop genital warts or cervical cancer. There is no treatment for HPV, but a healthy immune system can may protect the individual. There are treatments for HPV related diseases.
Genital Herpes
What is it? Genital herpes is an STI caused by the herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2).

Who gets it and how?
Genital herpes is common and both men and women can be infected. Genital HSV-2 infection is more common in women. Herpes can be found in and released from sores, but can also spread between outbreaks during sex or other contact. Abstaining and using condoms can prevent the spread of herpes.

Signs and treatment:
Most people have few or no signs of genital herpes. When signs do occur, typically one or more blisters form, which break, leaving sores. There is no cure for herpes, but antiviral medications can be used to shorten outbreaks.
Gonorrhea
What is it? Gonorrhea is an STI caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterium that grows and multiplies easily in the reproductive tract.

Who gets it and how?
Gonorrhea is a very common infectious disease that both men and women can get. Gonorrhea can be spread during sex (oral or otherwise) and childbirth and can be prevented by abstaining and using condoms.

Signs and treatment:
In men, signs include burning when urinating, a white, yellow, or green discharge, or swollen testicles. Signs are often mild in women but may include burning while urinating, unusual discharge or bleeding between periods. Several antibiotics can cure gonorrhea but drug-resistant strains of gonorrhea are increasing.
HIV
What is it? HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that kills your body’s "CD4 cells." HIV is the virus that cause AIDS.

Who gets it and how?
Any person can be infected with HIV. A person can be infected with HIV through blood, semen, vaginal secretions and breast milk. HIV can be prevented by abstinence, condom use, and avoiding sharing razors and needles.

Signs and treatment:
A person may exhibit no signs and be infected with HIV, thus testing is important. There is no cure for HIV, but treatment with medication can lengthen the lifespan of an infected person.
Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV)
What is it? LGV is an STI caused by three strains of the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.

Who gets it and how?
LGV affects men and women, but is suspected to be rare in industrialized countries. LGV is transferred from person to person through bodily contact (sexual or skin-to-skin) and can be prevented by abstaining or using condoms.

Signs and treatment:
Visual signs of LGV include genital papule(s), ulcers, and swelling of the lymph glands. LGV may also produce rectal ulcers, bleeding, pain, and discharge. There is no vaccine against LGV, but it can be treated with three weeks of antibiotics.
Syphilis
What is it? Syphilis is an STI caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum.

Who gets it and how?
Hundreds of people, both men and women, are diagnosed with syphilis every year in the US alone. Syphilis is passed from one person to another through direct contact with a syphilis sore and can be prevented by abstaining from sexual contact.

Signs and treatment:
Many people with syphilis do not have signs for years. Syphilis carries a risk for complications if left untreated for a long time. In early stages (under one year) one injection of penicillin (an antibiotic) will cure syphilis. For someone who has had syphilis longer, more doses will be needed.
Trichomoniasis
What is it? Trichomoniasis is a common STI that affects both women and men and is caused by the parasite trichomonas vaginalis.

Who gets it and how? An estimated 7.4 million new cases occur each year in women and men worldwide. The parasite is transmitted through penis-to-vagina intercourse or vulva-to-vulva contact with an infected partner. Abstaining and using a condom can prevent trichomoniasis.

Signs and treatment: In men signs are rare, but may include irritation inside the penis, discharge, or slight burning. Some women have signs which include vaginal discharge with a strong odor as well as irritation and itching. Trichomoniasis can usually be cured with prescription drugs (metronidazole or tinidazole).

Last edited by eunoia; April 15th 2010 at 05:36 AM. Reason: Updating.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
aids, chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, hiv, hpv, infection, infections, information, lgv, sexually, std, sti, transmitted

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 
User Infomation
Your Avatar

Latest Articles

Forum Stats
Members: 95,730
Threads: 159,989
Posts: 1,375,926
Total Online: 217

Newest Member: DanutaKing

Advertisement




All material copyright ©1998-2022, TeenHelp.
Terms | Legal | Privacy | Conduct | Complaints | Mobile

Powered by vBulletin®.
Copyright ©2000-2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search engine optimization by vBSEO.
Theme developed in association with vBStyles.