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Self Harm If you or someone you know is struggling with self harm and needs advice or alternatives, we're here to help.

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Debunking myths of self harm - February 5th 2014, 06:49 PM

Here is what I have so far. I'm not sure what else to write for the conclusion, should I define what self harm actually is? I also don't know what to write for the conclusion.

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; many of these myths are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm.

Myth: People self harm to gain attention
Fact: Many people who self-harm do it in secret, and cover up their injuries. People self harm often are fearful if anyone finds out about their self harm. Self harmers donít try to draw attention to themselves.
Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt
Fact: Self harmers donít want to die and for many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise.
Myth: Self harm is cutting
Fact: Self harm is any way of hurting oneself, such as scratching, pulling out hair and burning. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical feelings or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if everything seems to be out of control.
Myth: People who self harm can stop if they wanted to
Fact: Self harm can become addictive and therefore can be really hard to stop. Just telling someone wonít help them stop, self harmers need support to help them stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.
Myth: People who self harm like pain
Fact: Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings
Myth: The wound isn't that bad therefore the problem isn't bad
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of the feelings is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how bad the injuries are.
Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm
Fact: Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill, it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and people to understand.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need to support and someone who is understanding and who isn't judging or stereotyping them.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 5th 2014, 07:12 PM

It couldn't hurt to define "self harm" within the introduction of your article. =) Some people think "self harm" only refers to cutting, burning, bruising, etc. However, it can also refer to things like picking (not as well known) and abusing drugs/alcohol (if it is done with the intent to hurt oneself).

I'd like to elaborate on the facts you've provided by including statistics and information from reliable/reputable organizations, whenever possible. I'm happy to do that this week while you continue to work on the introduction and conclusion.

For the conclusion, you can always list resources that pertain to self harm (I suggest using the resources already listed on TeenHelp, for consistency's sake).

Does anyone else have ideas for this article? I love the concept (similar to what Traci did for one of her articles), and it can definitely make for a great article once we lengthen it and add more details. =D

EDIT: I'll hold off on further edits for the time being (want to give the author and other team members a chance to contribute). I wanted to show everyone what I have in mind, with regard to adding statistics and information from reliable/reputable organizations to the article.


Debunking myths of self harm

By Jenny (coolkid98)

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; many of these myths are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self-harm do it so in secret, and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often are fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. Self harmers don’t try to draw attention to themselves. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to gain attention from loved ones.
Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers don’t always want to die. and fFor many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise.
Myth: Self harm is cutting. [You could either leave this here, or include it within your introduction in order to define what "self harm" is.]
Fact: Self harm is any way of hurting oneself, such as scratching, pulling out hair and burning. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical feelings or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if everything seems to be out of control.
Myth: People who self harm can stop if they wanted to.
Fact: Self harm can become addictive and therefore can be really hard to stop. Just telling someone won’t help them stop, self harmers need support to help them stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.
Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.
Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of the feelings is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how bad the injuries are.
Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill, it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and people to understand.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need to support and someone who is understanding and who isn't judging or stereotyping them.






Last edited by PSY; February 5th 2014 at 07:42 PM.
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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 5th 2014, 07:59 PM

Thanks for your edits Robin I'll work on it either tommorow or friday night.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 5th 2014, 09:28 PM

I do like how Jenny put "self harm is cutting" as a myth. A lot of people do think of it is as only cutting and don't realize it's not only cutting. But of course, if you think it's best in the intro, that's okay too. I agree with defining what self harm actually is somewhere in the article, though, either in the introduction or conclusion, just so after saying the myths of self harm, we know what self harm actually IS.

I also like how you used that whole myth about self harmers being able to just stop whenever they want. Maybe to expand on that section a bit, you can explain why it is so addictive?

But I'm probably rambling anyway. I do like where you're going with this and it definitely will be great once expanded upon.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 8th 2014, 03:34 PM

Robin, would it be okay for you to get the statistics as I'm not sure where to get them from. I have applied all of edits Robin; thanks for your ideas Dez. Also, what do you mean by this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSY View Post
For the conclusion, you can always list resources that pertain to self harm (I suggest using the resources already listed on TeenHelp, for consistency's sake)


Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; many of these myths are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as a 'emo'.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to gain attention from loved ones.
Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers donít always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise.
Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of hurting oneself, such as scratching, pulling out hair and burning. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical feelings or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if everything seems to be out of control.
Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become addictive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings as it takes your mind of the feelings and focusing them on the pain. Just telling someone wonít help them stop, self harmers need support to help them stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.
Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.
Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of the feelings is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how bad the injuries are.
Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill, it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and people to understand.
Myth: Only young people self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need to support and someone who is understanding and who isn't judging or stereotyping them.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 8th 2014, 04:36 PM

Just to quickly answer your question, Jenny (since I don't know if Robin wants to get stats before edits ), I presume resources such as our new Hotlines page (http://teenhelp.org/hotlines/), or the Alternatives thread (http://teenhelp.org/alternatives - note no trailing slash) would be the sort of thing Robin's suggesting that you include.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 8th 2014, 04:59 PM

Oh ok, thanks Adam


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 12th 2014, 10:55 PM

I'll add and edit more later! =) I'd love to wrap this up within the next week.


Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; many of these myths are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as a 'emo.'.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to gain attention from loved ones.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers don’t always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, and burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical feelings or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if everything seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become addictive compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings as it takes your mind of the feelings and focusing them on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone won’t help them stop, self harmers need support to help them stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of the feelings is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how bad the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill, it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and people to understand.

Myth: Only young people self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need to support and from individuals someone who is are understanding and who isn't judging won't judge or stereotypeing them.





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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 14th 2014, 05:10 PM

Thanks for your edits and input Robin! I've also added a bit for the conclusion and will work on the introduction over the weekend.

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; many of these myths are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as 'emo.'

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to gain attention from loved ones.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers don’t always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical feelings or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if everything seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings as it takes your mind of the feelings and focusing them on the pain.Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone won’t help them stop, self harmers need support to help them stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of the feelings is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how bad the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill, it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and people to understand.

Myth: Only young people self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. Resources that are available on TeenHelp are the alternatives to self harm thread and the Hotlines, this shows all the helplines that are available to call.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 14th 2014, 08:17 PM

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; many of these myths[Adam: A little repetitive with 'many' and 'myths'?] are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as 'emo.' or other stigmatisation.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to gainreceive attention from loved ones.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers don’t always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances)[Adam: Is this section okay to be published without any Trigger warnings?], among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical feelings or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if everything seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings as it takes your mind of the feelings and focusing them on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone [Adam: Although I got what this was saying after re-reading it, it seems slightly oddly phrased?]won't help them stop,; self harmers need support to helpassist them to stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these feelings is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how badseemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such asat times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill, - it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young people self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender[Adam: If you're mentioning gender (which I think you should), can I suggest that you change 'people' to a gender - and I'd think 'girls' probably goes with the myth best.] may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in US emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. Resources that are available on TeenHelp are the alternatives to self harm thread and the Hotlines, this shows all the helplines that are available to call. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our Self Harm Alternatives and list of International Hotlines.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 16th 2014, 12:03 PM

Thanks for your edits Adam

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; the majority of these views are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as 'emo' or other stigmatisation.


Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to receive attention.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers donít always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances)[Adam: Is this section okay to be published without any Trigger warnings?], among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if everything seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings as it takes your mind of the feelings and focusing them on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone [Adam: Although I got what this was saying after re-reading it, it seems slightly oddly phrased?]won't help them stop; self harmers need support to assist them to stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how seemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as times of stress or traumatic events.[Jenny: I prefer the original.]Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill- it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young girls self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in US emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our Self Harm Alternatives and list of International Hotlines.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 17th 2014, 07:32 PM

In response to Adam's question, I think it's fine to list some examples of self harm. We already have a sticky in the Self Harm forum titled "Is this self harm?" which lists even more examples of self harm (and it does NOT have a "triggering" prefix). The issue is whether the descriptions are graphic. We're not describing how deep cuts/scratches are, how severe burns are, etc. We're not talking about using specific tools to cause self harm. I'd like to hear what other people have to say, though. One compromise may be to include something in the introduction that warns some of this educational material may describe some elements of self harm that could be triggering for members who are already experiencing active urges to hurt themselves. We could encourage those members to utilize the "Alternatives to Self Harm" sticky before continuing to read this article.





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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 17th 2014, 08:03 PM

I don't think it's necessarily triggering since we aren't describing the methods of self harm in detail or any sort of instruction on how to do those methods, so I don't know if a warning is necessary, but, if it makes it feel more comfortable to include a warning in the introduction, it would be fine.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 22nd 2014, 02:39 PM

I've made a few edits and added the trigger warning in the introduction.
Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

This article describes some elements of self harm that maybe triggering for some members, therefore it is encouraged to utilise the "Alternatives to Self Harm" before reading the article.
There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm; the majority of these views are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as 'emo' or other stigmatisation.


Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to receive attention.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers don’t always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if it seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings as it takes your mind of the feelings and focusing them on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone [Adam: Although I got what this was saying after re-reading it, it seems slightly oddly phrased?][Jenny: I think it makes sense how it is.]won't help them stop; self harmers need support to assist them to stop, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how seemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill- it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions therefore they need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young girls self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in US emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our Self Harm Alternatives and list of International Hotlines.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 22nd 2014, 06:01 PM

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

This article describes some elements of self harm that maybe triggering for some members,; therefore, it is encouraged to utilise the "Alternatives to Self Harm" thread before reading the article further.

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm;. tThe majority of these views are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as '"emo"' or other stigmatisation discriminated against in other ways.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to receive attention.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers don’t always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if it seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings, as it takes your mind off the feelings and focusesing them it on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone they need to stop because it's harmful [Adam: Although I got what this was saying after re-reading it, it seems slightly oddly phrased?][Jenny: I think it makes sense how it is.][Robin: How about adding something after the phrase so it's clear as to what you're telling someone?] won't help them stop; self harmers need support to assist them to in stopping, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often feel experience overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how seemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings, such as experienced during times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill - it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions. therefore tThey need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young girls self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in United States emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our thread of Alternatives to Self Harm and list of Iinternational Hotlines.





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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 26th 2014, 03:55 PM

Thanks for your edits Robin, I have applied them. Do you think I need to write more for the introduction or conclusion, or are they fine how they are?

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

This article describes elements of self harm that maybe triggering for some members; therefore, it is encouraged to utilise the Alternatives to Self Harm thread before reading further.

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm. The majority of these views are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as "emo" or discriminated against in other ways.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to receive attention.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers donít always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if it seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings, as it takes your mind off the feelings and focusing it on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone they need to stop because it's harmful [Jenny: It is clearer now that it says what to tell someone about.]won't help them stop; self harmers need support to assist them in stopping, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often experience overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how seemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings experienced during times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill - it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions. They need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young girls self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in United States emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our thread of Alternatives to Self Harm and list of international Hotlines.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 26th 2014, 08:55 PM

I can't think of anything at the moment - does anyone else have thoughts on the intro/conclusion? =) Length-wise, your article is over 800 words, so I don't think we need to worry about making it too much longer... maybe just a sentence here or there as needed.





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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 27th 2014, 10:57 AM

Hmm. Perhaps in the introduction you could say something about how most people are aware of self harm, but due to various factors (media portrayal, lack of actual experience with it, etc) they may not know exactly what it is. And then perhaps you could add something about why it's important to dispel these myths; you touched on this a bit by saying why the myths are bad, but maybe you could take it a step further and say something along the lines of 'This is why it's important to educate yourself about self harm...' Does that make sense?


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - February 28th 2014, 05:23 PM

Thanks for your suggestions Chess

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

This article describes elements of self harm that maybe triggering for some members; therefore, it is encouraged to utilise the Alternatives to Self Harm thread before reading further.

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm. The majority of these views are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm, this is why it is important to debunk these myths. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as "emo" or discriminated against in other ways. Most people are aware of self harm but due to factors such as media portrayal and lack of experience with self harm, has meant that people may not know exactly what self harm is.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to receive attention.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers donít always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if it seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings, as it takes your mind off the feelings and focusing it on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone they need to stop because it's harmful won't help them stop; self harmers need support to assist them in stopping, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often experience overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how seemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings experienced during times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill - it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions. They need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young girls self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in United States emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our thread of Alternatives to Self Harm and list of international Hotlines.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - March 1st 2014, 05:42 PM

So, I've had a read through, and as far as I can tell, there's nothing that needs changing.


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - March 1st 2014, 06:05 PM

Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

This article describes elements of self harm that may be [Added a space in "maybe".] triggering for some members; therefore, it is encouraged to utilise the Alternatives to Self Harm thread before reading further.

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm. The majority of these views are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm, this which is why it is important to debunk these myths. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as "emo" or discriminated against in other ways. Most people are aware have heard of self harm, but due to factors such as the media's portrayal of self harm and lack of experience with self harm, has meant that many people may not know exactly what self harm is.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to receive attention.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers don’t always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if it seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings, as it takes your mind off the feelings and focusing it on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone they need to stop because it's harmful won't help them stop; self harmers need support to assist them in stopping, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often experience overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how seemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings experienced during times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill - it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions. They need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young girls self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in United States emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our thread of Alternatives to Self Harm and list of international Hotlines.





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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - March 2nd 2014, 10:16 AM

Thanks for reading it Adam and thanks for your edits Robin I've applied them all
Debunking myths of self harm
By Jenny (coolkid98)

This article describes elements of self harm that may be triggering for some members; therefore, it is encouraged to utilise the Alternatives to Self Harm thread before reading further.

There are many myths about self harm and why people self harm. The majority of these views are false and lead to stereotypical views of self harm, which is why it is important to debunk these myths. Some of the myths prevent self harmers from telling others about their self harm due to fear of being labelled as "emo" or discriminated against in other ways. Most people have heard of self harm, but due to factors such as the media's portrayal of self harm and lack of experience with self harm, many people may not know exactly what self harm is.

Myth: People self harm in order to gain attention.
Fact: Many people who self harm do so in secret and cover up their injuries. People who self harm are often fearful of what will happen if anyone finds out about their self harm. According to the Mental Health Foundation, many self harmers are self-conscious of their injuries and experience a great deal of guilt as a result of hurting themselves. This also pushes self harmers to hide their injuries, rather than "showing them off" out of a desire to receive attention.

Myth: Self harm is a suicide attempt.
Fact: Self harmers donít always want to die. For many self harmers, self harm is a coping mechanism used to get through everyday life. It is used to help people cope with feelings that may not be expressed otherwise. Many researchers have noted that self harm refers to a spectrum of behaviors, and the literature provides support for six functional models of self harm. The "antisuicide" model actually states that self harm functions as a "suicide replacement, a compromise between life and death drives" (Suyemoto, 1998).

Myth: Self harm is cutting.
Fact: Self harm is any way of intentionally hurting oneself physically, such as scratching, pulling out hair, burning, picking and poisoning (including overdose of substances), among other things. It is a way of releasing feelings, either physical or emotional. It also can be a way of controlling something if it seems to be out of control.

Myth: People who self harm can stop if they want to.
Fact: Self harm can become compulsive and therefore can be really hard to stop. It is addictive because it is a way of distracting yourself from the feelings, as it takes your mind off the feelings and focusing it on the pain. Over the course of time, the brain may begin to connect the "false sense of relief from bad feelings to the [self harm]...and [the brain] craves this relief the next time tension builds" (KidsHealth.org, 2012). Just telling someone they need to stop because it's harmful won't help them stop; self harmers need support to assist them in stopping, and help to learn other coping strategies to get through self harm urges.

Myth: People who self harm like pain.
Fact: Sadomasochism is often sexual in nature, which is rarely the case with self harm. Self harm is about emotional pain, and is a way of releasing feelings through physical pain. For many self harmers, self harm is seen as the only way of coping with the situation. It isn't enjoyable and instead is a way to release feelings.

Myth: The wound isn't that bad; therefore the problem isn't bad.
Fact: Self harmers often experience overwhelming feelings and think that the only way to get rid of these is to self harm. This emotional distress should be taken seriously, no matter how seemingly insignificant the injuries are. Additionally, even "superficial" injuries can lead to serious infections or poor self-image, which may hinder a person's efforts toward recovery.

Myth: A person is mentally ill if they self harm.
Fact: While it's true that some individuals with diagnosed mental disorders self harm, there are also individuals who self harm because they are enduring a difficult situation and don't have more adequate or healthy coping techniques. Self harm is a coping mechanism used to help with feelings experienced during times of stress or traumatic events. Self harm alone doesn't mean a person is mentally ill - it means that a person is struggling to cope with their emotions. They need support and for people to understand.

Myth: Only young girls self harm.
Fact: Although young people are more likely to have self harmed than adults, it is possible that anyone of any age and gender may have self harmed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 372,722 adults aged 65 and older were treated in United States emergency departments for self harm in 2005. Emotional pain can drive individuals of all backgrounds to resort to self harm.

People self harm for a variety of reasons and there are many ways of self harming. Self harmers need support from individuals who are understanding and won't judge or stereotype them. TeenHelp has a variety of resources, including our thread of Alternatives to Self Harm and list of international Hotlines.[/quote]


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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - March 2nd 2014, 04:19 PM

The [/quote] tag needs to be removed at the very end (don't worry about it, I've failed at removing all the tags sooo many times!), but aside from that, I think we're ready for publication! =) Thank you for all your hard work, Jenny and Adam! Thank you for your input, Dez and Chess!

Any last-minute edits before Chess swoops in and does her thing?





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Re: Debunking myths of self harm - March 3rd 2014, 11:08 PM

This article has now been published.


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