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Death, Grieving and Coping With Loss Coping with loss is difficult at any age, but you are not alone during this difficult time. Reach out to other users in this forum.

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How to support a grieving friend. - June 21st 2018, 08:27 AM

This is an article I've been thinking about writing for a while, so I figured I should make a thread to see if a) it had been done before, and if not then b) if it's worth doing. I had a look through the Articles section and couldn't find anything, but if it's already been written or someone else has already claimed it then feel free to let me know and I'll drop it. Otherwise, does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions?



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - June 21st 2018, 11:41 AM

I think an article on how to support a grieving friend would benefit others. So far, nobody has claimed that topic for an article.

Would you include information about the grieving stages someone would be going through? That way others understand the stages of grieving and may help them more once they learn more about the stages.

Would you also include the effects of grieving on that person, how they may respond, or present themselves towards the friend or person?


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - June 28th 2018, 09:05 AM

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Originally Posted by MsNobleEleanor View Post
Would you also include the effects of grieving on that person, how they may respond, or present themselves towards the friend or person?
Could you elaborate a little bit on what you mean by this? I'm not sure I follow.



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - June 28th 2018, 12:04 PM

Of course, sorry for the confusion. The stages of grieving a person goes through https://www.webmd.com/balance/normal...tages-of-grief how it might affect those around someone who is grieving (friends, family, school, etc).


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - July 1st 2018, 11:06 PM

Since the article is about how to help a grieving friend, rather than how their grief will affect those around them, I probably won't be going much into that. I also likely won't include the stages of grief as I can't really see a way to go into that without making it the main focus of the article.



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - July 2nd 2018, 03:24 AM

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Originally Posted by Narrative. View Post
Since the article is about how to help a grieving friend, rather than how their grief will affect those around them, I probably won't be going much into that. I also likely won't include the stages of grief as I can't really see a way to go into that without making it the main focus of the article.

I like this article. I know that a lot of people don't know how to support friend's or family who are grieving. I dealt with the uncertainty of how to help my cousin when he lost his wife. I think having an article like this might help people and give them some insight.


It might be worth having an article about the stages of grief at some point. I don't think it has been done but I haven't looked into it too much. Not saying you would have to write it but I think a lot of people don't understand the stages or understand how those stages work. I know I learned volunteering that the stages happen at different times and in different ways.
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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - July 2nd 2018, 08:03 AM

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Originally Posted by .:Bibliophile:. View Post
I like this article. I know that a lot of people don't know how to support friend's or family who are grieving. I dealt with the uncertainty of how to help my cousin when he lost his wife. I think having an article like this might help people and give them some insight.

It might be worth having an article about the stages of grief at some point. I don't think it has been done but I haven't looked into it too much. Not saying you would have to write it but I think a lot of people don't understand the stages or understand how those stages work. I know I learned volunteering that the stages happen at different times and in different ways.
Thanks for the feedback! Also, for the record, I don't currently have any interest in writing an article on the stages of grief, so if anyone else wants to claim it then please feel free. I'm happy to help brainstorm and edit, I just don't particularly want to write it.



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - November 24th 2019, 03:44 PM

Since Charlie is no longer an Articles Writer, I was thinking of taking over this article.

I would like this article to come out in February as my BH's cat died two years ago this upcoming February, and I didn't know how to support her during this time. So I think it might be a nice little tribute to her and the cat she lost.

What does everyone think of this?
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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - November 26th 2019, 01:08 AM

That sounds good. I will probably message Charlie just to ask - I'm sure it is fine, but we've had people who have sent articles through PM to be published without being on the team.


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - November 28th 2019, 10:09 AM

Okay, I didn't realize that. Let me know what they say.
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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - November 30th 2019, 09:08 PM

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Originally Posted by Serendipity. View Post
Okay, I didn't realize that. Let me know what they say.
I spoke to Charlie and they are still interested in continuing this article. But, the good thing about the topic of grief is that a lot can be written on it (we don't have too many articles on it). You could do the stages of grief, working through pet grief, or anything else you can think of.


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - January 26th 2020, 08:30 PM

Hello! I have returned. I think I'm finally in a place where I can complete this article, so I'd like to keep working on it for the moment. If anybody has any suggestions or questions about it, please feel free to share; I'd love some input!



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - January 29th 2020, 04:07 AM

I'll probably end up changing this a fair bit, but here are the points I'm thinking of including so far:
  • don't make their grief about you (understand that you may get hurt even if their intention is not to hurt you, don't blame the grieving person for making your life more difficult, make sure you have your own support network while you support them)
  • be specific and proactive (give concrete offers of support, for example "would it help if I did x" rather than simply saying "let me know if I can help", don't leave the onus of reaching out to the person who's grieving)
  • your experience/knowledge is only a starting point (remember that everyone grieves differently and adjust your approach according to the person's own experience)
  • don't make assumptions; keep communication lines open (don't assume that other people are picking up the slack or reaching out to help, if you're not sure how to help then it's okay to talk about it with the person who's grieving, let them know that they can reach out to you if they need to)
  • practical help is as important as emotional support (while listening and talking to a grieving person is important it's not the only aspect, many grieving people struggle with everyday activities and may need help doing seemingly simple tasks)
  • encourage the grieving person to seek other support (know your limits and don't offer more help than you can definitely give, help the grieving person find alternative or additional avenues of support, make sure they know that this is because you care about them and want them to heal - not because they're not moving on quickly enough or because their grief is inconvenient for those around them)
  • take note of key dates (anniversaries and other specific dates can often be an especially difficult time, be prepared to offer more support around these times)
  • suggest activities to do together (these can be grief-specific, such as talking about the deceased person or looking at photos of them, or more general, like doing fun or soothing things together as a distraction)
I may think of some more points in the next couple of days, but in the meantime if anyone has any suggestions I would love to hear them!



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Last edited by Wingless.; January 30th 2020 at 05:55 AM. Reason: Edited to add in suggestions from another writer.
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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - February 11th 2020, 04:07 PM

Just stopping by to say that I still love this idea and think that what you have is awesome! Maybe you could talk a little bit about practicing self-care while supporting your friend, in addition to encouraging them to seek support. You could also maybe talk a little about productive ways to have that conversation with your friend - how you might set boundaries with them/communicate your limitations to them, how you might go about encouraging them to seek help, etc. Not sure, just some thoughts! But like I said, I love this!
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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - February 24th 2020, 09:05 PM

I really like what you have on your list so far. I thought of something but it might not entirely fit the topic. When you talk about doing things with a friend or taking note of key dates you could mention encouraging them to do something to honor their loved one. Can't think of too many ideas on it but each year on my loved one's birthday I make her favorite cake and light candles. Something like that. But it might not fit too well. Not sure.


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 22nd 2020, 01:27 AM

So, I'm in the process of writing this article now, but I'm worried it may end up being too long. I'm already over 800 words into it and I've only covered about three out of the eight or nine points I want to discuss. Do you think it would be better to somehow split the article in two to make it more readable or should I leave it all in a single, more sizeable article?



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 22nd 2020, 02:53 AM

Whichever you feel is more fitting will work. You could type it all up and then look at whether you want to keep it as one or split it into two. We could also use images in-between different points to help break up the text.


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 22nd 2020, 07:00 AM

Yeah, I'm not sure on this. Edit away.

How to support a grieving friend
By Charlie (Counted Heart.)

It can be difficult to see a friend in pain, and even more so when you’re unsure of what you can do to help them. While every person’s experience with grief is unique and it’s important to tailor your support to the person’s specific situation and individual needs, here are some things you should keep in mind and some general advice you can follow to start helping your friend through their journey with grief. Even if you have never been through grief yourself, you can still be there to support your friend during this time.

Remember that their grief is not about you.
You may have preconceived notions of what grief is like and how people react to it, but it’s important to remember that there is no right or wrong way to grieve. People handle loss in different ways, and as long as the person is not causing deliberate harm to themself or someone else they should be allowed to grieve in the way that feels natural to them. For some people this might mean needing extra support and wanting to spend more time with loved ones, while others may pull away and need to spend a lot of time alone. Remember that your friend is in a lot of pain and this is likely a confusing and overwhelming time for them, so don’t expect them to be at their best - and don’t hold it against them when they aren’t. While your friend is trying to find a way to cope with their loss they may say or do things that you find hurtful or inappropriate, but in most cases this is not their intent. A grieving person is essentially in survival mode, and you should be as understanding and forgiving as possible. With that said, you shouldn’t put your own wellbeing at risk to support your friend, so make sure you have your own support network during this time as well.

Understand that each experience with grief will be different.
If you’ve been through grief yourself can be helpful to draw upon your own experiences in order to help your friend through theirs, and this can indeed be a great starting point. However, it’s vital to keep in mind that your friend’s experience will be unique and they may grieve in a very different way to you. They may also grieve differently for different losses, so even if they have been through something similar before that doesn’t necessarily mean that they’ll handle it the same way this time. If you’re unsure how to help you may even find yourself doing research on the subject through books, websites, firsthand accounts, and other resources, which can all be a good way to bolster your knowledge and give you tools to help your friend. These are, however, only a first step, and you should always adjust your approach to suit the specific situation. If your friend doesn’t respond to one type of support, that doesn’t mean they don’t need your help; it just means that you may need to try a different approach. A grieving person turning away an offer of help is not a reflection of their feelings about you or the friendship, and you should try not to take it as a personal attack.

Keep communication lines open.
While it can be helpful to give a grieving person space when they need it, there can often be a fine line between giving them space and leaving them alone in their grief. The fact that your friend isn’t directly asking for help doesn’t necessarily mean that they don’t need it. Someone going through grief may be unable to ask for help because it involves emotional and mental energy that has been diverted to simply surviving. Asking for help on their end requires them to first pinpoint what they need and then identify who can help with it - and then find the time and energy to be able to communicate that to the person. Even then there’s no guarantee that their request for help will be honoured, and if they don’t receive the help they worked so hard to ask for they may not be able to reach out again. It’s far better for you to be the one reaching out, as it takes the emotional burden away from the grieving person, shows them that you care and are willing to help, and allows them to reciprocate rather than initiate. Be aware that your friend may not respond to messages in a timely manner, or sometimes even at all, but this doesn’t mean they don’t appreciate your efforts. One of the worst things you can do is become angry at or frustrated with your friend, as that can cause them to feel even more isolated and unsupported.

Be specific and proactive.
Grief is an exhausting and emotionally complicated thing, and knowing what would help can be difficult for both the grieving person and their loved ones. It can be tempting to reach out with an all-encompassing statement such as “I’m here for you” or “Let me know if there’s anything I can do to help”, but that might be too vague for your friend to be able to work with. There may be so many things they need help with that they won’t be able to narrow it down, or they might be unable to pinpoint what exactly they require. It's usually better to extend offers of help that are both doable and specific. For example, asking your friend “Is there anything I can do?” may be too overwhelming for them, but asking “Would it help if I did [activity or task]?” requires a much simpler response on their end. What you can offer will depend on the unique situation, so it can help to look at your friend’s existing support network and what else is going on in their life at the time. Your friend may need help with everyday tasks, such as shopping, household chores, and personal hygiene (e.g. by reminding them to shower). They may want somebody to talk to, or a distraction to keep their spirits up, or a regular activity to look forward to. By making specific offers, such as “Would you like me to cook dinner for you this Friday?” or “Would you feel up to having a board game night this weekend?” you will not only help your friend feel included and supported, but also allow them to dedicate emotional energy elsewhere instead of having to filter through their emotions and process their situation to assess their needs. Again, be understanding if your friend doesn’t respond in the way you expect or want them to. Even if they aren’t able to express it at the time, they likely still appreciate your efforts.

Don’t make assumptions.
The more you understand about your friend’s situation, the better equipped you will be to help them. Instead of making assumptions about what they need, how they’re feeling, or what other support they’re receiving, try to talk to them about it so that there are no misunderstandings. Even if you’re not the person’s closest friend, don’t assume that their other friends or family members are providing sufficient support for them. It’s not uncommon for a grieving person to report that the experience showed them who their real friends are, as people they thought they could rely on failed to step up while people they weren’t as close to came to their aid in unexpected ways. The worst case scenario if you do step up is your friend receiving more offers of help than they need; the worst case scenario if you don’t step up is that nobody else does either, leaving your friend not only grieving but feeling abandoned as well. Where possible, try not to guess your friend’s emotional state. A grieving person’s outward appearance and behaviour may not be an accurate reflection of their emotional and mental wellbeing. Someone who is crying a lot and talking about their loss may be less in need of support than somebody who appears put together and is keeping up with their day-to-day activities. The former may be expressing their emotions in a healthy way, while the latter may be putting on a brave face because they don’t feel safe enough to say how they really feel. Make it a habit to check in with your friend, and create a safe, judgement-free space for them to talk about how they’re doing - but, as always, don’t be upset if they don’t take you up on the offer.

Bear in mind that it may be a long journey.
Although it may seem like the first few days and weeks following a loss can be the most difficult to deal with, the truth is that grief is rarely a strictly linear process. Some people may forge through the first few months after a loss before falling apart later on, while others may seem to bounce back and forth between coping well and needing a lot of support. In many cases the amount of support a person receives decreases as time passes; house calls gradually cease, people stop checking in, anniversaries pass without comment. Grief, however, doesn’t fade as quickly, so your friend will still need support for months or even years afterwards. The amount and type of support they need will change as they come to terms with their loss, so be sure to make changes as necessary. Try to check in with your friend regularly, such as sending them a message once a week or going over to their house once a month, and take note of important dates like anniversaries so that you can be there if your friend needs extra support. Be aware that most offers of support taper off after the immediate aftermath, so putting in the extra effort can really help your friend weather the grief that comes after that.

Take care of yourself as well.
As you support your friend through their grief, it’s important to be aware of your own wellbeing. You shouldn’t be your friend’s only source of support, so, where appropriate, encourage them to reach out to friends, family, mental health professionals, and other relevant resources. Some places have grief support groups or specialised counsellors, so it may be a good idea to help your friend locate and access these. When discussing this with your friend, be clear about the fact that you want them to get the support they need because you care about them and want them to be able to cope with their grief in healthy ways, not because you don’t want to help them or because you think they’re a burden. Someone who’s dealing with grief may have intense emotional reactions, so do your best to reassure them that you’re there to help them and want what’s best for them. With that in mind, you should also be sure to establish and maintain boundaries so that your friend’s grief doesn’t become overwhelming for you as well. Know your limits and what help you’re both willing and able to provide, and make sure your friend is aware of this as well. If you can, lean on your own loved ones during this time so that you can help your friend without being your own sole support system. You can help your friend without putting your own health at risk.

The most important thing to remember when helping a grieving friend is that they’re going through something tragic and probably terrifying, and that means that they won’t be able to hold up their end of the friendship very well. It’s up to you to pick up the slack in the friendship and be the more active participant for the time being. This is likely one of the worst times of your friend’s life, so they won’t be at their best. By being there for them you’re helping ease some of their pain and help them stay afloat, which will preserve the friendship and allow your friend to grieve safely. And, if the friendship is a stable and healthy one, someday they may be able to return the favour.



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Last edited by Wingless.; April 24th 2020 at 01:45 AM.
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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 22nd 2020, 05:20 PM

I don’t have any edits but I’ll read it again later.

I personally don’t think it’s too long. It’s nice and thorough. If you’d want to split it into two articles, do you know how you’d want to go about it? You could do a series, like a part 1 and 2, or using images to break things up can still be done. Other than that I think all the points fit really nicely and it would be difficult to figure out how to split it unless we go with a part 1 and 2. Because then it would still be the same article.


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 22nd 2020, 11:29 PM

I think the only logical way to split it would be to restructure it a bit so part one would be how to help in the immediate aftermath and part two would be how to offer long-term support. I'm not entirely sure how I'd go about it since a lot of the suggestions I have would overlap between the two, but if that's an avenue you'd like me to explore I can definitely look into it. Otherwise if you're happy with the length it is now we can leave it as it is.



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 23rd 2020, 02:21 AM

That would be a cool way to split it up, but I think it’s perfect the way it is! I don’t think this needs much in the way of edits so hopefully we can get it published soon.


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 23rd 2020, 09:18 PM

Hey Charlie, are you happy with what you’ve written? I was going to publish soon and wanted to publish yours if you’re ready.

I know sometimes I like to reread mine before it gets published so I wanted to make sure you’re ready.


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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 24th 2020, 01:38 AM

If anyone else wants to look over it I'd welcome any edits, but otherwise I'm pretty happy with it as is.



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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 25th 2020, 06:30 AM

Just one tiny edit.


How to support a grieving friend
By Charlie (Counted Heart.)

It can be difficult to see a friend in pain, and even more so when youíre unsure of what you can do to help them. While every personís experience with grief is unique and itís important to tailor your support to the personís specific situation and individual needs, here are some things you should keep in mind and some general advice you can follow to start helping your friend through their journey with grief. Even if you have never been through grief yourself, you can still be there to support your friend during this time.

Remember that their grief is not about you.
You may have preconceived notions of what grief is like and how people react to it, but itís important to remember that there is no right or wrong way to grieve. People handle loss in different ways, and as long as the person is not causing deliberate harm to themself or someone else they should be allowed to grieve in the way that feels natural to them. For some people this might mean needing extra support and wanting to spend more time with loved ones, while others may pull away and need to spend a lot of time alone. Remember that your friend is in a lot of pain and this is likely a confusing and overwhelming time for them, so donít expect them to be at their best - and donít hold it against them when they arenít. While your friend is trying to find a way to cope with their loss they may say or do things that you find hurtful or inappropriate, but in most cases this is not their intent. A grieving person is essentially in survival mode, and you should be as understanding and forgiving as possible. With that said, you shouldnít put your own wellbeing at risk to support your friend, so make sure you have your own support network during this time as well.

Understand that each experience with grief will be different.
If youíve been through grief yourself it can be helpful to draw upon your own experiences in order to help your friend through theirs, and this can indeed be a great starting point. However, itís vital to keep in mind that your friendís experience will be unique and they may grieve in a very different way to you. They may also grieve differently for different losses, so even if they have been through something similar before that doesnít necessarily mean that theyíll handle it the same way this time. If youíre unsure how to help you may even find yourself doing research on the subject through books, websites, firsthand accounts, and other resources, which can all be a good way to bolster your knowledge and give you tools to help your friend. These are, however, only a first step, and you should always adjust your approach to suit the specific situation. If your friend doesnít respond to one type of support, that doesnít mean they donít need your help; it just means that you may need to try a different approach. A grieving person turning away an offer of help is not a reflection of their feelings about you or the friendship, and you should try not to take it as a personal attack.

Keep communication lines open.
While it can be helpful to give a grieving person space when they need it, there can often be a fine line between giving them space and leaving them alone in their grief. The fact that your friend isnít directly asking for help doesnít necessarily mean that they donít need it. Someone going through grief may be unable to ask for help because it involves emotional and mental energy that has been diverted to simply surviving. Asking for help on their end requires them to first pinpoint what they need and then identify who can help with it - and then find the time and energy to be able to communicate that to the person. Even then thereís no guarantee that their request for help will be honoured, and if they donít receive the help they worked so hard to ask for they may not be able to reach out again. Itís far better for you to be the one reaching out, as it takes the emotional burden away from the grieving person, shows them that you care and are willing to help, and allows them to reciprocate rather than initiate. Be aware that your friend may not respond to messages in a timely manner, or sometimes even at all, but this doesnít mean they donít appreciate your efforts. One of the worst things you can do is become angry at or frustrated with your friend, as that can cause them to feel even more isolated and unsupported.

Be specific and proactive.
Grief is an exhausting and emotionally complicated thing, and knowing what would help can be difficult for both the grieving person and their loved ones. It can be tempting to reach out with an all-encompassing statement such as ďIím here for youĒ or ďLet me know if thereís anything I can do to helpĒ, but that might be too vague for your friend to be able to work with. There may be so many things they need help with that they wonít be able to narrow it down, or they might be unable to pinpoint what exactly they require. It's usually better to extend offers of help that are both doable and specific. For example, asking your friend ďIs there anything I can do?Ē may be too overwhelming for them, but asking ďWould it help if I did [activity or task]?Ē requires a much simpler response on their end. What you can offer will depend on the unique situation, so it can help to look at your friendís existing support network and what else is going on in their life at the time. Your friend may need help with everyday tasks, such as shopping, household chores, and personal hygiene (e.g. by reminding them to shower). They may want somebody to talk to, or a distraction to keep their spirits up, or a regular activity to look forward to. By making specific offers, such as ďWould you like me to cook dinner for you this Friday?Ē or ďWould you feel up to having a board game night this weekend?Ē you will not only help your friend feel included and supported, but also allow them to dedicate emotional energy elsewhere instead of having to filter through their emotions and process their situation to assess their needs. Again, be understanding if your friend doesnít respond in the way you expect or want them to. Even if they arenít able to express it at the time, they likely still appreciate your efforts.

Donít make assumptions.
The more you understand about your friendís situation, the better equipped you will be to help them. Instead of making assumptions about what they need, how theyíre feeling, or what other support theyíre receiving, try to talk to them about it so that there are no misunderstandings. Even if youíre not the personís closest friend, donít assume that their other friends or family members are providing sufficient support for them. Itís not uncommon for a grieving person to report that the experience showed them who their real friends are, as people they thought they could rely on failed to step up while people they werenít as close to came to their aid in unexpected ways. The worst case scenario if you do step up is your friend receiving more offers of help than they need; the worst case scenario if you donít step up is that nobody else does either, leaving your friend not only grieving but feeling abandoned as well. Where possible, try not to guess your friendís emotional state. A grieving personís outward appearance and behaviour may not be an accurate reflection of their emotional and mental wellbeing. Someone who is crying a lot and talking about their loss may be less in need of support than somebody who appears put together and is keeping up with their day-to-day activities. The former may be expressing their emotions in a healthy way, while the latter may be putting on a brave face because they donít feel safe enough to say how they really feel. Make it a habit to check in with your friend, and create a safe, judgement-free space for them to talk about how theyíre doing - but, as always, donít be upset if they donít take you up on the offer.

Bear in mind that it may be a long journey.
Although it may seem like the first few days and weeks following a loss can be the most difficult to deal with, the truth is that grief is rarely a strictly linear process. Some people may forge through the first few months after a loss before falling apart later on, while others may seem to bounce back and forth between coping well and needing a lot of support. In many cases the amount of support a person receives decreases as time passes; house calls gradually cease, people stop checking in, anniversaries pass without comment. Grief, however, doesnít fade as quickly, so your friend will still need support for months or even years afterwards. The amount and type of support they need will change as they come to terms with their loss, so be sure to make changes as necessary. Try to check in with your friend regularly, such as sending them a message once a week or going over to their house once a month, and take note of important dates like anniversaries so that you can be there if your friend needs extra support. Be aware that most offers of support taper off after the immediate aftermath, so putting in the extra effort can really help your friend weather the grief that comes after that.

Take care of yourself as well.
As you support your friend through their grief, itís important to be aware of your own wellbeing. You shouldnít be your friendís only source of support, so, where appropriate, encourage them to reach out to friends, family, mental health professionals, and other relevant resources. Some places have grief support groups or specialised counsellors, so it may be a good idea to help your friend locate and access these. When discussing this with your friend, be clear about the fact that you want them to get the support they need because you care about them and want them to be able to cope with their grief in healthy ways, not because you donít want to help them or because you think theyíre a burden. Someone whoís dealing with grief may have intense emotional reactions, so do your best to reassure them that youíre there to help them and want whatís best for them. With that in mind, you should also be sure to establish and maintain boundaries so that your friendís grief doesnít become overwhelming for you as well. Know your limits and what help youíre both willing and able to provide, and make sure your friend is aware of this as well. If you can, lean on your own loved ones during this time so that you can help your friend without being your own sole support system. You can help your friend without putting your own health at risk.

The most important thing to remember when helping a grieving friend is that theyíre going through something tragic and probably terrifying, and that means that they wonít be able to hold up their end of the friendship very well. Itís up to you to pick up the slack in the friendship and be the more active participant for the time being. This is likely one of the worst times of your friendís life, so they wonít be at their best. By being there for them youíre helping ease some of their pain and help them stay afloat, which will preserve the friendship and allow your friend to grieve safely. And, if the friendship is a stable and healthy one, someday they may be able to return the favour.
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Re: How to support a grieving friend. - April 26th 2020, 08:37 PM

Since there was only a small edit (and I didn't think you'd mind) I applied it and published this.


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